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Chủ đề: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

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  1. #11
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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Build
    A Flower Border
    by Tracy Topps


    Materials Needed
    • 6�" Dolls House Fence Section
    • Glue Gun
    • Strong 8" Cardboard Sheet
    • Scissors
    • Small Bowl of Cold Water
    • Paper Towels
    • Moss, sheet type
    • Small Vine
    • Small Fern Pieces
    • 15-20 Tiny Assortment of Plastic Flowers, (in your choice of colors)
    • Bunch of Clay Flowers
    • 3-5 Small Plastic Plants
    • Green Polyfiber
    • Optional, fountain or other decorative garden pieces








    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of basic supply requirements




    TIP

    As you've noted from the materials list, I've included a small bowl of cold water. This is used just in case you burn your fingers with the hot glue! You can dip your burned finger into the water, which will make the glue peel off without too much pain.







    1. Take your fence and put it at the end of your cardboard. Make a line on the other end so you will know where you are going to cut it at the end. I cut around 3" in front of the fence by 6 1/2" wide by 3" deep. You can make it deeper. Mark the measurements about 3�"-4" deep if you are going to use a fountain or other decorative garden piece in the center.
    Enlarge picture marking the width of cardboard base

    2. Cut the cardboard and round the edges. You can leave it square if you like, but I always prefer to round my edges.
    Enlarge picture showing size of cardboard base after cutting
    3. Using your glue gun, add glue under your fence and press it to the straight (back) end of the cardboard base. Hold it in place and you can blow on it until it dries.
    Enlarge picture showing where to glue the fence down

    4. Press the sheet moss on the glue! Be careful it may be hot. If you are using a bird bath or other decorative piece, now is the time to add it in the center. Make sure you have centered the added piece.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add the first sheet moss

    5. Now add a bit of glue in the corner of the cardboard (see image).
    Enlarge picture showing where to add more glue


    6. Now add more sheet moss to the glued area while it is still hot. Press hard enough so that the glue grabs.
    Enlarge picture showing where to add glue and moss


    7. Add more glue, right below the area on the last step. Then add sheet moss to it the same way you did previously.
    Enlarge picture continuing to glue and moss

    8. Keep repeating these steps until you have completely covered the entire base. For those of you with bird baths, etc. you will need to add sheet moss up to the base. Press firmly so that you cannot see the bottom of your bird bath, feeder, etc.
    Enlarge picture showing complete covering and adding garden accessories

    9. Checking progress so far.
    Enlarge picture to showing progress so far

    10. Now we want to start adding flowers to the back of the fence. Take your fern and cut it to a size that you like. Snip a piece of wire and twist it around the bottom of the fern piece. Now add a touch of glue at the bottom of the wire. Press it down firmly into the moss base.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add the fern

    11. Showing where to place the fern along the fence line.
    Enlarge picture showing the placement of the fern

    12. Take out your small vine.
    Enlarge picture showing the vine

    13. Add a dollup of glue to the bottom of the vine.
    Enlarge picture on where to add glue

    14. Once the vine is in place, add a little of your sheet moss on top to cover the glue. Press hard and toward the fence so that it will stand up straight.
    Enlarge picture showing how to cover the base of the fern

    15. Take your tiny flowers bunches. Cut the top part off (so that the three parts are still connected). Doing them this way will make the flowers look more like a 1" scale.
    Enlarge picture showing how to prepare the flowers

    16. After cutting the flowers, you will have three tiny flowers per bunch, see image.
    Enlarge picture showing the cluster of flowers

    17. Add a drop of glue to the bottom of the flower cluster and place it down into the moss.
    Enlarge picture showing glue & placement

    18. Place them in a cluster around each other within the mossy areas.
    Enlarge picture showing the flower clusters

    19. Now choose your bunch of white flowers. Add glue to the bottom of this bunch and press down and add a pinch or sheet moss around the bottom area. This will aid the flowers to stand tall. If they lean, add a small drop of glue and press more moss around the bottom to make the flowers stand straight up.
    Enlarge picture showing how to straighten the flowers

    20. This is where you should be so far (see image).
    Enlarge picture showing garden so far

    21. Take a small bunch of light colored flowers. Add glue to the bottom and press into the moss.
    Enlarge picture adding more flowers

    TIP

    Always remember, smaller flowers should be in the front and larger flowers look better in the back.






    22. Cluster the flowers in threes. This adds symmetry to the garden.
    Enlarge picture showing flower clusters in threes

    23. Now select any of your plants (without flowers). Add them to the border in the back. Larger flowers go in the back.
    Enlarge picture showing border plants

    24. Remember to use a pinch of moss around the base of the plant and press it firmly to help the plants stand straight up.
    Enlarge picture showing moss being added to plants

    25. Next, take your clay flowers. Cut the wire stems about 1� inches below the flowers.
    Enlarge picture showing preparation of the clay flowers

    26. Take three individual flower stems then twist the wires together.
    Enlarge picture showing clay flowers twisted as one stem

    27. Add glue to the bottom of one bunch; press the bunch into the sheet moss. This will be your choice of placement, either in a nice grouping or spattered around the garden. As you see in the image, I made a grouping of mine.
    Enlarge picture showing clay flower placement

    28. Progress of border plants and flowers so far.
    Enlarge picture showing progress so far

    29. Now select a tall greenery piece that has foliage at the bottom and flowers at the top (see image) to add to your border.
    Enlarge picture showing new border flowering shrub

    30. Again, add glue to the bottom of the flowering plant and press into the sheet moss. Cover the base with moss if the glue is exposed.
    Enlarge picture showing garden border after shrub placement

    31. Now turn your fence around to the back like it is shown in the image. You will be using the green polyfiber next. Remove a small piece and set aside. Add glue along the fence line.
    Enlarge picture showing polyfiber preparation
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  2. #12
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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Make
    Shabby Tri-Mirror with Ribbon
    by Heidi Ashworth


    Materials Needed
    • One Two-Inch Oval Mirror
    • Two One-Inch Oval Mirrors
    • Brown Polymer Clay
    • Cream or Off White Acrylic Paint
    • Fine Sand Paper
    • Clay Extruder With The Shape Discs That Come With It
    • Clay Tools Such As Clay Knife And One With A Straight Edge
    • Pencil
    • Flat Baking Sheet
    • Glue, Tacky Or Super Glue
    • Paint Brush, Small








    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of basic supply requirements





    1. Take the large mirror and trace around it onto the surface you are working on.
    Enlarge picture tracing the large mirror
    TIP

    I use an old flat baking sheet, an air bake pan, because it doesn't have a ridge around it. However, you can use the under side of any pan you don't mind getting pen marks on.







    2. Now take the two smaller mirrors, trace these in separate areas. This will be the pattern for the clay.
    Enlarge picture tracing the smaller mirrors
    TIP

    Work and condition your clay a little before you put it in the extruder.






    3. Next take your brown polymer clay and press it into the extruder. I used the medium flat disk however, if you prefer, you can use the half round disk for a softer look. Extrude the polymer clay a line that is approximately enough to form it around the large pattern that you drew. Once you get your clay all around the pattern, cut the ends at an angle and smoosh the ends together. Repeat this process for the smaller patterns.
    Enlarge picture showing polymer clay extrusion

    4. After you have your large oval formed, you need to decide where the small mirrors shapes will go in juxtaposition to the large one. It is good to make the clay stick to the pan because that will keep the shape intact, especially if the clay is cold and stiff. Once the three shapes are formed, join them together and set aside.
    Enlarge picture showing how to position your mirror together

    5. Next we will move onto the ribbon being extruded and tied. Here you can use any size round dot disk you wish. A flat disk, will produce a flat ribbon look which is really pretty. I did a very simple ribbon but you can jazz it up any way you want. Extrude a piece of clay about 8" long. Begin tying the clay, in the traditional shape of a bow. Take your time, otherwise the clay will break.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the ribbon


    6. Continue tying the polymer clay length into a ribbon shape, leaving long lengths to drape across the mirrors.
    Remember take it slowly so as to not break the length of clay.
    Enlarge picture showing how to loop the ribbon


    7. Completed polymer clay ribbon.
    Enlarge picture showing completed polymer clay ribbon

    8. Attach the completed ribbon section to the large oval frame at the top and give it a little push to adhere the clay. Drape the tail of the ribbon over the two smaller oval frames.
    Enlarge picture showing how to attach the ribbon to frame

    TIP

    Now the fun part! Embellish your frame any way you want. You can take a clay tool and make little indentations all along the frame, either a straight line from side to side or you can use a tool that has a rounded end and make little "dents" like a mermaid fish tail affect. You can be really creative and personalize the mirror to your own style. You can make tiny flowers, tiny balls of clay, or stylize with tiny sculptures.

    Check the mirrors in the frame to make sure there are no gaps. Because the clay shrinks when baked, it could have gotten too big on the inside. So, if that happened/happens, then you can extrude a small line of clay as filler. Just place the filler around the frames that have shrunk, then rebake. It is a much smaller amount of clay, so ten minutes should be the bake time.






    BAKING

    Bake the clay according to the directions on the package. For example, some say "bake 15 minutes for every 1/4 inch of clay". After baking, let the clay cool. Once cooled, the frame will remove easily. It is okay if the frame is flexible, the clay will continue to harden as it cools. Ideally, your three ovals and your ribbon will be stuck together still. However, they might not be so just glue them in place. In my example, I decided to use wax paper underneath as I glued and painted so that it would look nicer than my usual--the beat up old pan. DON'T use the wax paper! The paint sticks to it and makes it peel off of the frame. Use your pan if you don't care, or use a piece of cardboard or even just a piece of computer paper.






    9. Take your paint and brush and apply the first coat of paint. You will need to be sure to get the edges of the frame, inside and out, and under the ribbon.
    Enlarge picture showing first layer of paint

    TIP

    When you are going to use the distress method, I feel that you should really paint it so that you can't see through to what is underneath. I guess that is just my personal preference--some people do distressed stuff by doing light layers of paint but my philosophy is that these distressed pieces are items that someone painted white a long time ago and that they wanted it to look nice at that time. It is only now that we cherish the distressed look because it means it is an antique, etc. So, even though I am going to just sand it off again, I paint it as many times as it takes to give it a good solid look, usually three or four layers. Of course, if you don't intend to distress, you will want to do that anyway.






    10. Let the first coat of paint dry. Then paint again. As mentioned above, if you are using the distress method, you may want to repaint several times. In this instance, I have two coats of paint on this frame. Let dry thoroughly.
    Enlarge picture showing second application of paint

    11. When the frame is completely dry, turn the frame over. You need to apply a touch of glue to the frame where each oval is touching. This will insure the bonds of the different sections. Let dry. Now you can paint or distress your frame. To distress the frame, use fine sand paper and choose areas where the item would have naturally been worn down. Once you are satisfied with the look, glue your mirrors into place. The frame is going to be bigger than the mirror so you only want to add glue to the inside edge of the frame. Not the inner edge. Let dry. If you do get glue on the mirror, you can gently scrape it off after its dried.
    Enlarge picture showing where to secure the frames with glue

    12. Completed distressed mirror!
    Enlarge picture showing completed mirror with frame

    TIP

    Hanging the mirror is a question I'm often asked. This is a challenge I think every miniature enthusiast faces. I have had some success with Fun Tack, but its not recommended since the mirrors are heavy. A good alternative would be to glue a tiny string from one end to the other one the mirror, just like a real life wire hanger. Then you can hang the mirror on a tiny nail in the dolls house. Also, you can glue the entire mirror to your dollhouse wall, but this is permanent.
    Woman of short-lived passions

  3. #13
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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Sculpt
    Pumpkins
    in 1:12 Scale
    with IGMA Artist
    Sandra Keller Palesch


    Materials Needed
    • Polymer clay for Pumpkins
      - Sculpey� in 'Sweet Potato' ~ makes a deep orange pumpkin
      - Premo� in Cadmium Yellow ~ mixed with equal parts of Sweet Potato makes a medium orange pumpkin
      - Mix 2 parts Cadmium Yellow with 1 part Sweet Potato for a light orange Pumpkin
    • Clay Mixture for Stems
      - Premo� Ecru
      - Premo� or Fimo� Translucent
      - An alternative for the stems you can us twigs that are light-colored if you'd prefer
    • Ceramic tile
    • Uncoated Paper Plate
    • Cornstarch
    • Ball Stylus
      - Small
      - Medium
    • Straight pin
    • Razor Blade
    • Brush
      - For Artist Pastels or chalks
      - For varnish
    • Artist Pastels\Chalks:
      - Brown
      - Dark Olive Green
      - Light Olive Green
      - Yellow-Orange
      - Ivory (optional, but helpful)
      Think of the colors on a pumpkin stem when selecting your chalk colors. Stems can vary from light brown, dirty ivory, mossy green to grey-greens
    • Liquid Fimo
    • Toothpick
    • Varnish: Matt & Medium varnish
    • Water (for thinning varnish)
    • Tweezers
    • Future� Floor Wax
    • Course Sandpaper








    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of basic supply requirements





    1. Here are some of the clays and combinations of clays I use to make pumpkins:
    - Sculpey�'s Sweet Potato
    - Approximately 1/8 of the 'Sweet Potato' and 7/8 of the Premo� Cadmium Yellow
    - About � Sweet Potato and � Cadmium Yellow
    - Equal parts Sweet Potato and Cadmium Yellow
    Clay Mixture for the Stems (unless you intend on only using twigs for a stem)
    - Equal parts Translucent (any brand) and Premo� Ecru
    Thoroughly mix whichever color combinations you'd like and set aside.
    Enlarge picture showing clay color combinations
    TIP

    Sculpey� has great colors of clay but they tend to be quite soft and can get sticky with a lot of handling or if you have warm hands. Placing the clay in the freezer for a few minutes will make it much easier to work with.

    You can also put a bit of cornstarch on your hands to help keep the clay from sticking.







    2. Roll the pumpkin clay into approximately � inch balls and the stem clay into snakes about 1\8 inch round.
    Enlarge picture showing size to roll

    3. If you prefer your pumpkin to have a more 'flat top and bottom' squeeze the clay between your index finger and thumb. The other ball is for a more 'rounded' pumpkin.
    Enlarge picture showing cut pieces
    TIP

    If you have a ball stylus tool you know that each end has a ball at the tip. One is larger than the other. I have 2 such tools. One has a large ball tip on one end and a medium ball tip at the other end. The other ball stylus has a small ball tip and again the same medium ball tip. I use them interchangeably depending on the size of what I'm making.

    What you do you if you don't have one of these snazzy tools? Any small tipped implement that can create a nice little concave will work nicely. But do get yourself one of these tools (or both) and you'll find all kinds of uses for them.






    4. For these pumpkins I used the Small/Medium tips and just slightly indented where I wanted the stem to be and the blossom end. The photo below shows the small ball tip making marking the end. I used the medium ball tip to mark the opposite side for the stem.
    Enlarge picture showing where to use the ball stylus

    5. Result of marking with the ball stylus.
    Enlarge picture showing results of ball stylus

    TIP

    Remember, that pumpkins come in a variety of sizes, shapes, colors. Ribs themselves can be very deep to hardly noticeable ~ and everything in between. Think about how the ribs are most often haphazard in their placement. While they always go in the same direction the spacing is usually random. Some pumpkins do have a more defined spacing like the real-life miniature Jack-be-Little pumpkins.






    6. Now we are going to sculpt the pumpkin's ribs. Before making the ribs expand the hole for the stem using a tool similar to the one in the photo. Make it deep enough to anchor the stem ~ at least 1/8th of an inch but not too much deeper. Using a tool similar to the one in the photo (a toothpick or straight pin also work fine) place the pointy end at the top of the pumpkin near the stem's opening. Depending on how deep you want the ribs lay the tool down and press into the clay while guiding it all the way down to the blossom end.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the ribs


    7. Do this all the way around the pumpkin. Don't worry if the ribs lose some definition while handling the clay. We will come back and give them a final definition before curing them.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the ribs all the way around

    8. For the stem slice a piece of clay about a � inch long. Lift the piece of clay off the tile with your razor blade and carefully set it into the stem's hole. You may need to adjust the hole's opening to accommodate the stem. If the stem seems too large or even too small for the size of the pumpkin you may need to roll and slice another piece of clay.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make and place the stem

    9. After setting the clay upright in the hole use the small end of the ball stylus or a blunt-ended toothpick to gently but firmly anchor the stem in place. Go all the way around nuzzling the stem in place. Doing this is two-fold: 1), it secures the stem; and 2), it gives the stem the natural roughness or lines you see on the stem of a pumpkin. This is just the beginning of how we are going to give our pumpkin's stem some character.
    Enlarge picture showing how to smooth the stem

    10. Since the blossom is actually the scar where the blossom's flower came off we want to texture the area. I used my dental tool that has the tiniest point and sort of roughed it up. A straight pin would work. So would a piece of sand-paper. Take a corner of the sandpaper and carefully rough up the clay a bit.
    Enlarge picture showing how make the stem look natural

    ALTERNATE STEM ATTACHMENT

    I was in a hurry when I made the pumpkins in the photo. I'm not thrilled with how they turned out but this is for educational purposes only. What I wanted to show is, that if you are having difficulty keeping the desired shape to the pumpkin (particularly if it's really tiny like these � inches) you might want to sculpt the pumpkin and bake it.

    You Must Leave A Hole For The Stem - Don't Forget!!

    Once it's baked and cooled you can then work with the stem and not disturb the shape of the pumpkin. Make sense?

    This can be a good alternative if you find the pumpkins shape is hard to maintain while working with the stem.

    To attach the stem use Liquid Fimo� in the hole before placing the uncured clay. Remember, anytime you have baked polymer clay and you want to attach uncured polymer clay you must use a liquid polymer clay as a bonding agent.

    Use a tiny amount to line the hole and a bit around the rim to secure the clay in place. Once it's in place follow the method for anchoring the stem as in the previous section of Step Five.






    11. The pumpkin on the right was done using the method we've discussed up till now. It started out having the same shape as the one on the left ~ although it was a bit smaller. The one on the left (the alternative method)had the stem added after the pumpkin was baked.
    Enlarge picture showing an alternate method

    TIP

    In the following steps, I've included two different methods for attaching stems to the pumpkin. The next couple of steps show a pumpkin lid receiving its stem. Because of it's small size and because it can be easily distorted while handling I prefer to bake the lid before I attempt to sculpt the stem. It's just easier for me.






    12. I need to put it on some Blue Tack to hold it in place. Remember, once the clay is cured it's not sticky any more and can be a challenge to hold in place.
    Enlarge picture showing how to hold the pumpkin down while sculpting

    13. I use Liquid Fimo� to attach the stem to the pumpkin. See the prior steps ~ An Alternate Way to Attach a Stem for further discussion.
    Enlarge picture showing the attached stem

    TIP

    When pressing the stem be sure to support it with a finger on the opposite side to keep the stem from being pushed over. It will move over slightly. Just push it back in place and move on.

    Don't worry if the stem gets too long because we're going to cut the tip off later.






    14. I use a variety of tools when sculpting the stem depending on the size of the stem or how the clay is reacting to me trying to manipulate it into my shape. As we did in the previous step the ball stylus can be used to create nice deep-rounded lines. I may then use a toothpick to create another shape as I sculpt. For smaller stems I'll use a straight pin.
    Enlarge picture showing use of the stylus tool

    15. Once you have the line how you like them you may want to twist the stem slightly or even a lot to give a nice curve to your stem.

    If the stem seems to have gotten short or thicker than you like you can elongate the clay by pushing it upwards with a blunt ended type of tool. Just turn the pumpkin around as you sort of 'knead and coax' the clay upwards.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add detail

    16. After all the discussion about sculpting a stem there are times when there is nothing better than a well placed twig to make your pumpkin complete. The lone pumpkin in this photo isn't one of them but I couldn't find a decent twig.
    Enlarge picture discussing where to add the twig

    17. Here is a nicer example showing a table with a bottom shelf and three large pumpkins.
    Enlarge picture displaying placement of pumpkins

    18. This photo shows the top of the table sporting a small pumpkin for decoration while two baby pumpkins are used to hold candles. I put some Liquid Fimo� on the portion of the stem that would be going into the pumpkin then baked baked it for about 20 minutes.
    Enlarge picture displaying another placement of pumpkins

    TIP

    Now that we have the stem attached and nicely sculpted we want to add color.

    Lightly dust the area you want to add the chalk\pastel to ~ on the stem and on the pumpkin itself. The cornstarch just makes it easier to apply the color evenly. Without it, I find the color really sticks to the area I first put it onto and I have a hard time getting it blended? A bit of cornstarch helps if you find the clay gets warm, soft and sticky in your hands.






    19. To add color we're going to use Artist Pastels or Artist Chalks. I prefer to work with them in a powder form so I gently scrape the sides of the pastels with a razor blade. Take care not to breath in the dust and try not to touch the pastels with bare skin. Some pastels may be made with toxic ingredients, just a precaution.
    Enlarge picture showing how to prepare the chalks

    TIP

    Don't 'blow off' any excess pastel dust. Use a brush to gently lift off anywhere on the pumpkin you don't want to breath the pastel dust, ok? Remember, safety first.






    20. A Green Stem ~ Using a fine tipped paint brush I put a small amount of the darker olive green pastel and dab the stem in various spots all around the stem. I'll usually add a couple of shades of green pastel at a time. I don't know if it gives it depth but I think it does!! Blend the pastel as you go along adding color where needed.
    Enlarge picture showing how to create a green stem

    HOW TO CREATE A BROWN STEM

    I do the same thing as the green but with a medium-dark brown pastel. You can also use a different clay mixture that I just stumbled on this week (that's why it wasn't in the supply list. I used equal parts Premo� Raw Sienna and the clay stem mixture we've been using. Blend thoroughly. It offers a very nice medium brown stem color.






    21. At some point I usually use course sandpaper to scuff or rough the stem a bit, gently though. I may deepen the lines on the stem if, the lines seem to be loosing their shape from the brush going over them. I will also often use a tiny bit of an ivory-colored pastel to add dimension to the green.
    Enlarge picture showing how to course up the stem

    22. Here I've got it colored just about right. Notice, I did add a bit of the green coloring to the pumpkin itself. I just dipped my brush into the green powders and then tapped it on the side of my dust dish to shake a bit of the powder off. The reason I do this is I don't want to have a big 'glob' of pastel powder on the brush when I touch the clay. I only want to add a bit of color at a time. More color can be added if there isn't enough. It's always easier to ADD color than to take color away, right? Go around the pumpkin touching the brush to the orange clay (closest to the stem, in this case). Blend the pastel to create a realistic effect.

    Think of putting on blush or rouge. Once you have the color on your cheeks you want to blend or feather the color to reduce the intensity of the color (usually, right?). We want to do the same thing with the color we added to the pumpkins skin.
    Enlarge picture showing how to refine the highlights of the pumpkin

    23. Here is the pumpkin so far.
    Enlarge picture showing progress so far

    24. No matter how long, short, narrow or wide you want the stem to be it will look more realistic if the tip is cut off exposing the inside.

    Lay the stem like in the photo and quickly lop off the tip. Try not to crush the side against the tile or all your work sculpting the stem may need to be redone. We need to cut the tip off the stem before we can texture it.
    Enlarge picture showing how to cut the stem

    25. Yes, I know this is a terrible photo but it shows how I use a very fine, pointy dental tool to rough up the stem's blunted end.
    Enlarge picture showing how to rough up the stem

    26. You can also use a straight pin to poke fine little holes randomly in the tip. I also use a razor the make indentations in the sides at the top of the stem so it isn't perfectly round.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use the razor to define stem

    27. To finish off the coloring I use the ivory-colored pastel on the tip. It adds just the right color and texture to the stem.
    Enlarge picture showing where to add the ivory-colored pastel

    28. Now is the time to go back and look at your pumpkin and see what ribs, if any, need to be redefined, etc. When you are happy with your masterpiece place it on an uncoated paper plate and bake in a preheated oven at 250-275 degree for 20 minutes.
    Enlarge picture showing final steps before baking

    TIP

    Whenever you don't want your item ~ in this case a pumpkin ~ to have a 'shiny bottom' place it on an uncoated paper plate to bake it. Using the ceramic tile will make it shiny.






    29. After the pumpkin is cool you can add whatever amount of shine you'd like or not. In this photo I've applied a thin coat of Future� Floor wax on the pumpkin. That's right.....floor wax. This clear floor wax is so thin it is a great choice for any item that you want to have a very thin coating of varnish. You can also use a matte or medium gloss varnish. I happen to think high gloss makes the pumpkin look like plastic. Don't apply varnish\wax to the stem, though? Stems are not shiny in real life.

    That's it.... I hope you have fun making your sweet little pumpkins!!!
    Enlarge picture showing how to use floor wax
    Woman of short-lived passions

  4. #14
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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Make A
    Desk Set with Pen & Ink Blotter
    in 1:12 Scale
    with
    Sarah-Jane Waller


    Materials Needed
    • One Piece Of Thin Flat Card Stock
    • Electrical Tape, one each
      - Red
      - Green
      - Blue
    • One Piece Of Marbled Paper, (or Green, Red or Blue)
    • One Piece Of Artist Painting Paper (Thin) Or Lightly Embossed
    • Small Feather
    • Green ‘Bottle Like’ Bead ½cm
    • Gold Bead 4mm
    • Brass Button 1½ cm
    • Double Sided Tape
    • Tacky Glue
    • Scissors
    • Ruler
    • Pencil
    • Optional :
      - Cocktail Stick
      - Leaf Sequin 2½cm
      - Felt Tip Pens Or Paint
      - India Ink








    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of basic supply requirements





    1. Take your piece of thin card – marbled paper and watercolour paper measure out rectangle’s at:
    - Card – 5cm x 3½cm
    - Marbled paper – 5½cm x 7½ cm
    - White water colour paper – 4cm x 3cm
    Now you should have 3 rectangles in front of you in varying sizes.
    Enlarge picture showing sizes of card to cut
    TIP

    Use a cutter, steel rule or knife, if you can, you will get a straighter edge. Plus the measurements are quite important so take your time and get it right! Don’t throw away the scraps you can use them for other areas as we progress.







    2. Next cut a piece of double sided tape or glue (I prefer double-sided tape as it's stronger) and stick it to the back of the card. Do not remove the tape cover on the exposed side.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place the tape

    3. Take your coloured/marbled piece of paper and turn it upside down so the pattern is on the table. Now peel back the double sided tape from the card stock and carefully place in the centre of the paper (see image). Press down firmly. If you are using glue, allow to dry completely before continuing.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply the card stock to the marbled paper
    4. Next take your pen and ruler and draw a line across the corner angles of the paper. Cut off the drawn corner triangles as shown.
    Enlarge picture showing where to cut the marbled paper

    5. Cut a piece of double-sided tape and place it in the centre of the card stock. Peel of the tape on the opposite side. Fold in the sides of the marbled paper gently creasing as you go - then the top and bottom until it is all folded over (if gluing, allow to dry).
    Enlarge picture showing where to fold the marbled paper

    Questions and Answers

    Q. Are the cut corners all meant to be the same size?
    A. As best you can, although you will be covering it in the next few steps.






    6. Next you will be making the top of the desk pad! Take your cut-out piece of watercolour paper, apply a piece of the double-sided tape and apply it to the centre of the paper. Place the paper dead centre on the board, as shown in the image. The cut-out paper will need to have equal sides, equal top and equal bottom. The top and bottom will be narrower than the sides, so be careful how you do this; once placed it will be impossible to remove! When ready, carefully press firmly down.

    Enlarge picture showing how to place the watercolour paper


    7. Now the fun begins... Take your chosen coloured roll of tape and cut off 2½ cm square. Cut across the diagonal and place on the corners as shown in the image. Repeat for each corner. Hold the board up to a window or light source, then carefully trim off the excess tape so that it fits the corners. At this stage, if you want to, you can repeat the process for the board back then trim it, then press down all edges. You now have a desk pad!
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the corner placements

    8. Now we will make the pencil and ink well.

    Take your gold bead and glue it at a slight angle to the top of the green larger bead. This will form the ink well. You need the bead to be angled so that the quill will be slightly tilted when inserted. Once dry, paint the inside of the beads with black acrylic paint to resemble ink; dribble a bit down the top bead.

    Next we'll make the pencil. First take the cocktail stick and measure 2cm and cut off with scissors. Paint the cut off stick with either the felt pen or paint to just near the end. Leaving the end unpainted. After all the pieces are dry, dip the unpainted end of the stick into the India ink to create the illusion of lead.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the ink well and pencil

    TIP

    You can cut down cocktail sticks then paint or stain them different colours to create miniature pencils for a playroom or school room.






    9. Next we'll make the feather quill. Using small scissors, take a feather and begin trimming from the bottom up, not taking off too much feather. Cut the feather at an angle at the very tip and broaden the cut as you move up. Trim off all of the feather at the base which will create the nib. Try cutting with different feathers. Dip the Quill in black acrylic or the Indian ink to give an authentic feel to it. Leave to dry.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the quill

    10. Take either your button or leaf and glue the ink well onto it. Dry completely. Place your newly cut quill pen in the ink well and the pen on the base and place or glue onto your ink blotter.
    Enlarge picture showing how to secure the pieces to a base

    11. For authenticity, I always take the end of the left over cocktail stick and dip it in the India ink, then drop or drag it over my blotter. Then take the left over watercolour paper, trim back to size and with a tiny '00' pen or cocktail stick dip into the India ink and write out a menu or letter to Mom on the paper. You can add extra touches like envelopes or notepads.
    Enlarge picture showing final touches

    12. I hope you enjoyed making this and you had fun.
    Enlarge picture showing completed desk set

    TIP

    You can cover the blotter base with very thin leather, then trim around the edges with a gold paint pen for a richer style. You could also make the set larger. Fixing them to a study (desk) and making a layout by carefully taking out a bit of the wood and gluing the blotter to the board. Change the colours of the tape also changes the appearance.
    Woman of short-lived passions

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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Sculpt
    Miniature Peaches
    in 1:12 Scale
    with IGMA Fellow
    Betsy Niederer


    Materials Needed
    • Premo� Polymer Clay
      - Cadmium Yellow
      - Translucent
      - Raw Sienna
      - White
    • Fimo� Polymer Clay
      - Leaf Green (or you favorite clay in an equivalent color)
      - Translucent
    • Chalk Pastel - Red
    • Small Soft Paint Brush
    • Single Edge Blade
    • Stem Tool or Ball Ended Tool
    • Cornstarch
    • Pin
    • Dental Tool (optional)









    CLAY RECIPE


    Peach Yellow: � Cadmium Yellow + � Translucent
    Stem Brown: � Raw Sienna + � White (You will only need a tiny amount of this)
    Green Leaf: � Leaf Green + � Translucent
    Make sure your clay is well mixed.







    1. To start, roll your yellow clay into a snake, about � inch in diameter.
    Enlarge picture showing rolled clay

    2. Using your blade, carefully cut the yellow snake of clay into about 1/6th of an inch pieces, and roll the pieces into round balls.
    Enlarge picture showing size of pieces to cut

    3. This is a stem tool. It's used for making icing flowers. This particular one is plastic and is part of a "Confectionery Tool Set" which is sold by Wilton Industries�. It's plastic and therefore, must be cleaned thoroughly after any contact with polymer clay. As you can see, my tool has started to 'melt' from not being well cleaned. Once icing tools have been used for polymer clay, they must not be used with food. If you do not have a tool like this, a small ball ended tool will work very well.
    Enlarge picture showing the stem tool

    4. Using a stem tool or a ball ended tool, poke a small indentation into the top of your clay peach.
    Enlarge picture showing where to make the indentation
    5. Using either your dental tool, or a pin, make an indentation down the side of the peach from the stem end on top to the blossom end on the bottom.
    Enlarge picture showing where to make indent down the side

    6. Your peach should look something like this.
    Enlarge picture showing peach so far

    7. Using your fingers, very gently form a slight point on the bottom of your peach. This will be the blossom end.

    If your clay feels sticky, dust your fingers with a little bit of cornstarch, and letting your clay rest for a few minutes will allow it to cool off a bit.
    Enlarge picture showing side indent on peach


    8. Using your fingers, very gently squeeze the indentation on the side closed so that your peach looks like it has 'cleavage'.
    Enlarge picture showing how to place the watercolour paper


    9. Side view of the peach 'cleavage'. If you have fingerprints on the side of your peach, you can gently rub them out with a bit of cornstarch.
    Enlarge picture showing peach cleavage

    10. Crush some of the red chalk, and using your small, soft brush, apply some red to the sides of your peach. Try to remember what a real peach looks like. It usually only has red on one side, and yellow on the other. If possible, use a real peach as a model.
    Enlarge picture showing how and where to apply artist chalk

    11. The color should look very soft and blended on the side of the peach. Don't be afraid to add the chalk, you want the fruit to have vibrant color!
    Enlarge picture showing how to blend the artist chalk

    12. Here are some peaches that have been colored. Please notice that I have left part of the skin yellow.
    Enlarge picture showing applied artist chalk

    13. Using the brown 'stem' colored clay, roll a very thin snake shape.
    Enlarge picture showing how to create stem

    14. Using your pin or your dental tool, take a very tiny piece of the brown clay and insert it into the indentation on the top of the peach. When you pick peaches, most of the time the wooden stem comes off the peach and stays on the tree. Peaches usually only have a light brownish colored spot on the inside of the indentation on top.
    Enlarge picture showing stem

    15. Using your green clay, make a small leaf shape. Peach leaves are generally long and thin. Use your pin or dental tool to form a 'vein' on the leaf.
    Enlarge picture showing how to create the leaf

    16. Attach the leaf to the peach center.
    Enlarge picture showing where to attach the leaf

    16. Your peaches should look like this.
    Enlarge picture showing peach so far

    BAKING INSTRUCTIONS

    Bake your peaches at the correct temperature for the clay that you are using. When the peaches are cool, you do not have to add any varnish or sealer as the red color will bake into the clay. If there is any excess chalk on your peaches, just wipe it off with a soft cloth.

    Make sure that you wash your hands well after using polymer clay.
    Woman of short-lived passions

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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Make
    A Miniature Ladies
    1920's Hat
    with Janine Crocker


    Materials Needed:
    • Thin Flexible Cardstock
    • 4 Inch Square Piece of Fabric for hat (textured or tiny patterns)
    • Piece of Co-ordinating Lining Fabric, 4 Inch Square
    • Tacky Glue
    • Scissors for Card and Fabric
    • Tiny Clamp or Clothes Peg
    • Miniature Trim or Braid, Picot or Bunka
    • Decorative items
      - Braid
      - Trimmings
      - Flowers
      - Jewelry Findings
      - Feathers
      - Lace
      - Tulle
      - Buttons
      - Pearls








    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of basic supply requirements


    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of additional supply requirements





    1. Cut out a piece of card, approximately 3" x 3/8". If the hat is to fit a doll, you can test the fit by wrapping it loosely around the doll's head and leave an overlap of 3/8", then trim to fit.
    Enlarge picture showing size of pattern
    2. Lightly apply tacky glue all over one side of cardstock and stick onto the "wrong" side of lining fabric.
    Enlarge picture showing the gluing and binding of fabric to card

    TIP

    If you apply the glue with your fingers, then it won't show through a fine fabric.






    3. Trim around the edges of the fabric.
    Enlarge picture showing where to trim

    4. Smear the glue onto the other side and place onto the "wrong" side of the hat fabric, leaving a tiny edge 1/16" along the top and 3/8" to one side.
    Enlarge picture to show where to apply glue on the wrong side of fabric

    5. Run a line of glue along the bottom edge to prevent fraying.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue


    6. Glue along the top edge and fold the fabric neatly over.
    Enlarge picture of how to fold fabric


    7. Press down well.
    Enlarge picture showing where to press firmly

    8. Test the size of the crown again and dab glue onto the extra fabric at the end. The other end can be trimmed, if the hat needs to be smaller.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue

    9. Gently bend the piece around into a circle holding together firmly for a couple of minutes.
    Enlarge picture showing where to bind the two ends

    10. Clamp ends with the peg and set aside to dry.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place clothes peg along the crown

    11. While the band is drying, take a piece of 1½" square piece of cardstock.
    Enlarge picture to show size of cardstock needed

    12. Join the wrong sides of the lining fabric and the hat fabric onto each side of the card.
    Enlarge picture showing the joining of the lining and fabric

    13. By this time the crown piece should be dry. Remove the clamp/peg and glue along the raw edge in a thin line.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue on the crown

    14. Now gently push the crown into an oval shape. The seam can be at the back, front or side in the place where you will be putting the most decoration to hide it so now is the time to decide where you want it.

    Stick the crown down onto the lining - you can weigh it down with a small book. Allow to dry completely.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make crown tip

    15. Once the hat is dry, cut carefully around the edge as closely as you can.
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim

    16. You now have a basic hat shape and you can start the really fun bit - the decorating!
    Enlarge picture to showing hat ready for decorating

    17. Inside view of basic hat shape.
    Enlarge picture showing inside view of hat

    18. Use the narrow trim to cover the tiny join at the top of the crown. Rummage through your selection of bits and decide what you will use to decorate your hat. For a 1920's hat jewelry findings come in especially useful, as do feathers and unusual braids
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim hat

    19. Choose trim for the lower part of the crown.
    Enlarge picture showing option to trim hat

    20. Add beads, feathers, etc. to decorate; use your peg to clamp where needed. Allow all pieces to dry thoroughly.
    Enlarge picture showing embellishment options

    21. Completed and decorated hat. With the techniques you have just learned, you can make any style hat you desire. Altering the shape just a little will greatly change the style to fit your next hat, so play and experiment.
    Enlarge picture showing completed hat
    Woman of short-lived passions

  7. #17
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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Make 1:12 Scale
    Miniature Drapes with
    Vanessa Parry


    Materials Needed:
    • Cardstock - 4"x8" Thin Piece
    • Ruler
    • Pencil
    • Scissors
    • Glue - Tacky Type
    • Cotton Fabric
    • Lace or Braid
    • Hairspray: Extra Hold
    • Fine Dressmaking Pins - Have A Good Supply
      NOTE: The pins used for bridal fabrics make the smallest holes
    • Foam Pad or Mouse Pad
    • Knitting Needle
    • Table Knife or Pergamano Embossing Wheel For Scoring
    • Moist Wipes






    INSTRUCTOR SUMMARY

    This is a 'no sewing' required curtain tutorial.

    Because of scale issues, if you want curtains with a realistic looking 'fall', it is not possible to make them functioning, i.e. able to be drawn open or closed. This tutorial will show you how to make an open pair. They do not hang from a rail but are fixed to a solid pelmet.







    1. Cut two pieces of fabric for your curtains. Each should be the width of your window. Length will be a personal preference for you but when you've worked it out add ¼" for the hem and ¼" for fixing at the top. If this turns out to be too long you can always trim away at the top before you fix.
    Enlarge picture showing size of fabric to cut
    2. Cut two thin strips of card, approximately ¼", the length of the fabric you've just cut, plus an extra ¼". The extra ½" makes it easier to handle later. Decide which is going to be the wall edge of each curtain piece. If you have a patterned fabric make sure you get the pattern going to same way on both pieces. From now on you're going to work each step with both curtains. This will ensure you don't get two left curtains or one upside down.

    Turn your fabric so that the wrong side faces you. Glue your strips of card to the outside window edge. Make sure that you leave ¼" clear at the bottom hem edge and that you have the excess card at the top edge. This will help you identify the top edge.
    Enlarge picture showing size of cardstock



    TIP

    If you are using silk fabric to make your curtains, don't use glue. Use the double sided iron-on bonding web they use for hemming trousers/skirts. I've never found a glue that will remain invisible on silk.






    3. When the card is dry, turn the edge inward and glue it in place so that the card is now invisible and you have a clean hemmed edge at one side of your curtain. Now you can tell which is the top edge, because you have a bit of card sticking out.
    Enlarge picture showing how to cover the card

    4. Turn and glue the hem at the other side of your curtain. No card on this edge, since you want it to be flexible.
    Enlarge picture showing how to glue the opposite side


    5. Turn up and glue the ¼" hem at the bottom of your curtain. You should now have two hemmed curtains.
    Enlarge picture showing how to glue the hem


    TIP

    Sticky tables, sticky fingers, sticky sofas, sticky lots-of-other-things that shouldn't be sticky happens while making curtains. Use your moist wipes frequently to remove the glue.






    6. Next, gather your foam pad, knitting needle and pins to prepare for pleating. First, pin your first curtain to the pad along the card stiffened edge. At the inner edge of the card so that you have a flat section at the outer edge. I usually use four pins and recommend you use as few pins as you feel you can get away with. You will need at least one at the top edge and one at the bottom hem.
    Enlarge picture showing how to begin pleating

    7. Slip your knitting needle beneath the fabric and butt it up against the line of pins.
    Enlarge picture showing how where to place the knitting needle

    Q&A

    Q: Is there a certain size that the needle should be or does the size we want our pleats indicate what size needle we should use

    A: The pleat size determines your needle size. I recommend not trying to get your pleats too small. If you take a look at all my curtains they only ever have five or six pleats in each.







    8. Push the fabric up to form a fold over the needle and pin it in place close against the needle.
    Enlarge picture showing how to push the fabric over the knitting needle

    TIP

    Use a pin to pull your fabric into place over the needle. It works better than a finger and you can see what you're doing. Plus, as soon as the fabric is in place you can use the pin to fix it to the pad. I use about 3 pins per fold, but if you don't feel confident with that few, use more. A lot will depend on your fabric and I've been known to use more on occasion.

    Work one curtain at a time, but make sure you end up with the same number of pleats' (folds) in each.






    9. When you have the first fold pinned in place, slide out the knitting needle and slip it under the fabric again, butting it up against your new line of pins. Form another fold, as you did the first time. Then continue the same steps, until you have all your fabric pleated. Repeat with the second curtain.
    Enlarge picture showing the second pleat

    Q&A

    Q: Does this method make the cloth dry hard or will it be movable?

    A: It will depend to a large extent on your fabric. Silk will come out as stiff as cardboard. Cotton will vary. Fabrics with a high man-made fibre content are the most difficult and in some cases impossible. Silk is one of the few fabrics I've found that doesn't seem to spread open after a while. So it's ideal if you want to make straight curtains. The best fabrics are cotton and silk or fabrics with a high percentage of either.






    10. Both curtains have been pleated now.
    Enlarge picture showing completed pleats

    TIP

    You can stop here if you want a straight pair of curtains. Spray your curtains with hairspray and set them aside to dry. Make sure the curtains are good and wet.

    If you want tie backs for your curtains continue with the next steps. I recommend using the tie back method as lots of fabrics will spread after hanging a while, leaving you with curtains wider at the hem than at the top.






    11. To make the tie backs cut two strips of fabric 3"long by ½" wide.
    Enlarge picture showing size of fabric for tie backs

    12. Turn in one side of the length and make a hem. Glue along the edge, press down, then glue to the opposite side.
    Enlarge picture showing where to fold the hem line

    13. You should end up with two long strips about half an inch wide.
    Enlarge picture showing tie backs

    14. Measure up your curtains at the card edged side, somewhere between 2½" and 1" from the bottom hem. The longer the curtain you are making, the greater the distance. I would use 2½ inches for an 8½ inch long curtain and 1 inch for a 5½ inch curtain. Mark this point by pushing a pin through the fabric and into the foam pad.

    Mark both curtains this way at the same time. This way you ensure they are both the same. This step is difficult, so be patient with yourself. Using a pin, gently push the fold nearest your card edge towards the pin you've just placed and pin it in position close against the card. Repeat this with the second pleat.
    Enlarge picture showing how to begin pleating

    15. You cannot move more pleats up close unless you remove some of the pins now. From the hem and possibly from further up too. Try not to remove any pins above your tie back if you can help it. Carefully remove the remaining pins between your tie back area and the hem. If you're very careful about it the folds will still be visible so that you can then drag them up to the edge of the curtain at the tie back mark too.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the second pleat

    16. This will leave you with a fan like section below your tie back. Carefully drag the folds back so that they lie parallel to the card edge and pin them in place. Continue with pleating.
    Enlarge picture showing the set-up for the second pleat

    17. You should now have two very realistic looking pleated curtains and the last step is easy. Using your can of hairspray, spray them thoroughly. Now you just lay them on one side to dry and bring them back with you next week. Don't unpin them in the meantime.
    Enlarge picture showing hairsprayed pleats

    TIP

    Saturate the curtain pleats with hairspray heavily, make sure they are good and wet.






    18. Next comes the pelmet. Measure your window width. If you are using decorative architrave include that in the measurements; then add half an inch. The extra half-inch is to ensure there is an overlap of ¼ inch each side of the window, just as you would if you were dressing a full size window. Now draw a rectangle the length you have just calculated and 3/8 inch deep.

    Diagram 2 on the pattern, draw another rectangle, attached BELOW the first one. This should be one inch deep and extend 3/8 inch wider at either end than the first rectangle you drew. Diagram 3 on the pattern, draw another rectangle, this should be half an inch deep and extend 2/8 inch wider at either end than the first rectangle you drew. Take a look at diagram 4, score along the lines (marked in red on diagram). Cut out your shape. Fold all the score lines inward then flatten them again. This is your basic curtain pelmet shape. The front of the pelmet is the bottom rectangle.
    Enlarge picture showing pelmet diagrams

    19. Now you need to cover the pelmet you just made. Cut a rectangle of fabric the same size as your pelmet, plus ¼ inch all around, then lay face down. Spread glue along one long edge of your fabric and fold it in.
    Enlarge picture showing fabric cut for pelmet

    20. Fold the other edge of your fabric over the pelmet and glue in place to give a nice neat edge. Snip the excess fabric at the pelmet corners diagonally to reduce the bulk.
    Enlarge picture showing other hem

    21. Snip in from the edge of the fabric to the center rectangle of your card pelmet at both edges of the indentation. Fold that fabric in and glue in place.
    Enlarge picture showing where to fold the fabric

    22. Fold in all the remaining raw edges and glue in place. You have now completely covered your pelmet. Decorate the front pelmet (the largest rectangle) with braid or lace. Whatever takes your fancy.
    Enlarge picture showing the remaining edges being folded
    23. Turn your curtains right side down. Attach a tie back to each curtain (as shown) with a dab of glue at the card side. Make sure you have the right side of the tie back facing you.
    Enlarge picture showing where to attach one end of the tie back

    24. When the glue is dry, wrap the tie back around the curtain from front to back and glue in place on itself at the stiffened outside edge of your curtain. Attaching the tie back at a slight downward angle for a realistic look. Snip off any excess fabric. Let dry.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place the tie back in the front

    25. Now bring in your pelmet and lay it face down. Snip off any excess card left at the top of each curtain. Spread glue on the inside back edge of the pelmet. On the inside of the rectangle that you have not decorated. Only put glue where you're going to attach the curtain.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue for pelmet

    26. Press the curtains into place on the glue. Only press down in the valleys of the folds or you will squash your pleats flat. If your fingers are too large to get in the valleys, use the flat of your knitting needle or the flat of a pair of tweezers to press. Make sure you get the curtains edges at right angles to the pelmet. Let dry. Once dry, apply glue on the outside face of the back side pelmet tabs.
    Enlarge picture showing how to attach the pelmet

    TIP

    I use a pre-gridded craft board to make sure I get proper right angles, you can 'eye it' or simply mark the right angle on a card with a pen or tape.






    27. Fold your pelmet forward, affix the side tabs of the front to the side tabs of the back. This will form a little box pelmet.
    Enlarge picture showing how to affix the side tabs to the pelmet

    28. Flip over, gently press down the front of the pelmet.
    Enlarge picture showing how to secure the front pelmet

    29. Your curtains are now finished.
    Enlarge picture showing completed curtains
    Woman of short-lived passions

  8. #18
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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Sculpt
    A Miniature Breakfast
    in 1:12 Scale
    with IGMA Fellow
    Betsy Niederer


    Materials Needed
    • Premo® Polymer Clay, Half A Bbar Each
      - Translucent
      - White
      - Cadmium Yellow (Or Any Medium Yellow)
      - Orange (Just A Teeny Tiny Bit)
      - Burnt Umber (Or A Chocolate Brown)
      - Alizarin Crimson (A Dark Purplish Red, almost Like Burgundy Wine Colored)
    • Chalk Pastel
      - Golden Ochre (A Rich Deep Gold)
      - Medium Brown (Just A Tiny Bit Needed)
    • Delta Creative® Transparent Glass Paint (Or Any Stained Glass Paint)
      - Amber
      - Clear
    • Acrylic Varnish
      - Gloss (But Only If You Can’t Find Clear Stained Glass Paint)
      - Satin
    • Sandpaper – Around 80 Grit
    • Single Edge Blade
    • Ceramic Tile
    • Pin, Needle, Or A Pointy Toothpick
    • Dried Oregano
    • Small Paint Brush
    • Small Cup Of Water
    • Tacky Glue Or Any Glue That Dries Clear
    • Hand Wipes Or Paper Towels
    • Optional: A Plate To Put Your Food On









    PREPARATION & COMMENTS


    Before you start working with clay, please wash your hands – even if your hands look clean you’d be surprised how much dirt can be on them, and it will show up in your white clay. I also dust my hands with cornstarch or talc powder after washing and drying to get rid of any excess moisture, as well as bits of dust.

    Preheat your oven according to your clay directions.

    NOTE
    If you are using the new Fimo® formulation, please make sure that you check the baking temperature as this is lower than previously. If you are mixing new Fimo® with old Fimo® you need to use the lower baking temperature, so the mix doesn’t burn!







    1. We'll start with making the eggs - you will need to mix up the yolk color first. Mix a small bead of orange clay with about a ½ inch (12.7mm) square chunk of yellow to make a rich egg yolk color. You can adjust the color as you wish, just don’t make it too orange.
    Enlarge picture showing mixture for the egg yokes
    TIP

    You'll only need a little bit of the orangish yellow, so you can mix up the amount that you want using the proportions below. If you have extra just stick it in a zip lock baggie for another time.







    2. Roll a snake of clay around 1/8th of an inch thick. Using your blade cut small chunks about 1/16 (1.6mm) of an inch each from the snake. Roll them into a ball. These will be your egg yolks. Don't be overly concerned about getting the measurements exact, just an approximation is fine!
    Enlarge picture showing clay snake

    3. Use your finger to flatten the yolks slightly on the tile. If the yolks come off the tile and stick to your finger, just dust your finger with some powder.
    Enlarge picture showing how to flatten the clay

    4. Put the yellow yolks to the side and wash your hands again. It's time to mix up the white clay for the 'whites' of the eggs, and we don't want yellow streaks in it. Mix about a ½ inch (12.7mm) square of translucent with a bead of white as shown.
    Enlarge picture showing mixture size of the egg whites
    5. Roll the translucent/white mix into a snake as shown and using your blade cut off 1/16 inch (1.6mm) chunks.
    Enlarge picture showing size to cut to make the egg whites

    TIP

    The objective about the egg whites, you want them to be more on the translucent side. If you add too much white they end up being chalky looking. Most foods are extremely translucent, and that's an important part of getting them to look real!






    6. Press the whites flat with your finger on the tile. They should stick to the tile, but if they stick to your finger instead just dust it with powder.
    Enlarge picture showing how to create the shape of the egg white

    7. Press the sandpaper into the egg white to flatten it further, and put some texture into it. You might have to go over it several times before it is ready. If the white rips a bit on the edges, that’s ok. You don’t want the whites to be perfect circles. Think about how they look in a pan when you fry them. The whites run all over the place. If your clay sticks to the sandpaper, just dust it with some powder.
    Enlarge picture showing how to texturize


    8. Carefully scrape the white off of your tile with your blade, and gently put it over the top of a yolk. It might help to dust your blade with a little bit of powder to help it slide under the clay.

    Remember that yolks are not always centered in fried eggs, so position some yolks off to the side, and some in the center of the white. Gently press the white over the yolk so they adhere. Put a little bit of powder on your finger and very gently press the white down over the yellow yolk. See how the sand paper gives the white a nice textured appearance?
    Enlarge picture showing how to bring the egg yokes to the egg whites


    9. Notice that there’s enough translucent in the egg white so that the yellow yolk is visible. The white has been gently pressed so that it adheres to the tile, but the yolk is nicely rounded. Don’t flatten your egg out too much, and try to keep your white as thin as possible.
    Enlarge picture showing fried egg variances so far

    10. You can also use some of your white/translucent mix to make a few unbroken eggs for your breakfast scene. When you roll your egg shells make sure to make them with a slightly more pointed part on one end. If you'd like to make some broken shells, you can press some of the white/translucent mix on to the end of a small paint brush like this -
    Enlarge picture showing how to make unbroken and broken shells

    TIP

    Baking the eggs: Bake your eggs according to your clay's baking temperature and instructions. Baking your eggs for about 20 to 25 minutes should be enough since they are so thin. When they are done, take them out to cool, but leave your oven on!






    11. Onto the bacon while the eggs are baking.

    You’ll start with the fat. You will want this to look a bit ‘cooked’ already; so mix a ball of translucent with a tiny bit of burnt umber clay. The ball of translucent in this picture is about the size of a ping pong ball, and the little bit of brown is about the size of a pea. Please feel free to down size the quantities, since this makes a lot of bacon fat! If you have extra just put it in a zip lock baggie and save it for later. I always have the best luck starting with the translucent and gradually adding the color until I have the right shade. The color that you end up with should look like icky, very translucent, light brown, like on the right.
    Enlarge picture showing blends of clay for the bacon fat

    12. To mix up the bacon meat color, you’ll need about equal parts of burnt umber and translucent + about half as much alizarin crimson as shown. So the ratio is about 1:1 burnt umber (dark brown)/translucent, then 2:1 burnt umber+translucent to crimson. If you don't have alizarin it's not a big deal, you can use any dark red or even a more reddish red, just add the red color slowly to get the color you're looking for. You can refer to 'real' bacon for a reference.
    Enlarge picture showing blends of clay for the bacon fat

    13. Next, you will make a layered cane. To start – flatten out a piece of the fat color, about as long as the first joint on your finger, (I’m terrible at measuring, but about 1.25” would be fine for now, that’s around .3cm).
    Enlarge picture showing how to begin making the cane

    14. This is about 3/8ths of an inch or around .75cm. You don’t have to be exact since we’re going to be reducing this.
    Enlarge picture showing first clay piece of the bacon cane

    15. Now flatten out a strip of the red meat color, big enough to fit on top of the slab of fat.
    Enlarge picture showing flattened meat color of the cane

    16. Like this! Notice how I’m not being exceptionally neat, it’s not a big deal for this cane since bacon is not straight.
    Enlarge picture showing the flattened bacon cane

    17. Flatten out a slightly thinner layer of fat and layer this on top of the meat color.
    Again, don’t worry about being too neat about it.
    Enlarge picture showing insertion of fat clay into meat cane

    18. Here’s where you can get a little bit creative with your layering to make your bacon look real with chunks of meat running through the fat instead of just making stripes. For this layer, I formed the meat colored clay into a sort of long tear drop shape, only about half as wide as the clay slab. The layering doesn't have to be perfect because you will be adding texture and color later.
    Enlarge picture showing insertion of fat clay into meat cane

    19. Here you can see that I have added the same sized strip of fat colored clay beside meat clay. This will make up the 4th layer, half of it will be 'meat' color, and half will be 'fat' color. The 'fat' color clay should be a little bit tapered on one side so it fits over the 'meat'.
    Enlarge picture showing how to layer the bacon cane

    20. Cover up the meat part with another piece of the fat colored clay. Then you can put one more thin layer of meat color clay on, as the top layer, (reference the arrow). That should be about enough. You don’t want the bacon to look too stripey.
    Enlarge picture showing last layer of the bacon cane

    21. This is the cane with the last piece of meat colored clay on top. I didn't cover the entire top of the cane with the brown/red clay, just about 3/4ths of it. To reduce the bacon cane - You can start reducing this right away, you don’t have to let it sit and cool off (unless your clay is really mushy, then just pop it in the fridge for a few minutes). We want this cane to be long and thin so gently press the cane with your thumbs all over the length, being sure to use equal pressure all over, and gradually lengthen it by gently pulling it apart as shown. By pressing and gently pulling your clay, this will move the way you want it to. Go slowly! If you reduce it too fast it might get smaller than you want it. Also, if the cane starts looking too wide (we want to keep it around the width of your index finger) you can gently press the sides back into shape and continue to lengthen it).
    Enlarge picture showing how to thin the cane

    22. Here's what it looks like from the side as you reduce the cane.
    Enlarge picture showing side view of the bacon cane

    23. When it’s about .5” wide (around 1.7cm) and 3/16 inch (.7cm thick) you’re done. Cut into the center of the cane, and it should look something like this. Don’t panic if it doesn’t look exactly the same. Even a remote approximation is going to work out just fine!!
    Enlarge picture showing size of bacon cane

    24. Time to slice it up! If your clay is warm, you might want to wait on this for a few minutes. You can also put your cane in the freezer to firm it up before you cut it. You want nice thin slices. Slice up as many as you want. I always make more than I think I need because I usually wind up ripping some, and generally goofing up. Even if you get a partial slice, that’s fine, we can use it!!! Try to get them as thin as you can!
    Enlarge picture showing sliced cane

    25. This is what I’m after! You’ll notice that not all of my slices look the same, I sliced the bacon in this image from another part of the cane. Again, bacon slices are not always the same sizes.
    Enlarge picture showing sliced bacon

    26. Press your bacon slices on to your tile to secure them, then dust them with some talc, cornstarch, or chalk so the tops are less likely to stick. We need to texture them.
    Enlarge picture showing how to powder the bacon

    27. Texture your bacon with sand paper, tap the pieces gently so they stick to the tile. If they come off on the sand paper you can coax them off with a pin. If they rip, don’t worry about it, that’s why you made extras!
    Enlarge picture showing how to texture the bacon

    28. This is where they start looking more like cooked bacon! Use a small soft brush, gently color the edges with the Burnt Green Earth (or medium brown) chalk pastel. Use a light hand, don’t coat the whole strip, just the edges and maybe a little bit in the center. We’re going to add more color later too. The whole time you’re doing this think about how a real bacon strip looks like.
    Enlarge picture showing how to highlight the bacon

    29. After your bacon has a bit of color, grab your toothpick or pin and gently gnarl up the edges just a bit.
    Enlarge picture showing how to rough the edges of the bacon

    30. When bacon cooks it shrinks, and gets bubbly on the edges, and sometimes curls up in the center. Very gently slide your blade under the bacon and very, very, carefully lift it off of the tile so we can shape it.
    Enlarge picture showing how to shape the bacon

    31. Gently drape the center of the bacon slice over the thin end of a toothpick. You can bake the slice just like this – the toothpick won’t burn. The slice will retain its shape when cured.
    Enlarge picture showing how to drape the bacon over a toothpick

    32. I use another toothpick to help arrange the slice, or you can just do it with your fingers, as shown. This is sort of hard to do and you can leave your bacon flat on your tile, if you rather, it will still look really good that way!
    Enlarge picture showing how to arrange the bacon with a toothpick

    33. You can use a variety of ‘poses’ for your bacon slices. They look best this way when you put them on a plate. They’re ready to bake now, so get your eggs out of the oven and put the bacon in. You should only have to bake the bacon for about 20 minutes because they are super thin. When you're ready, go ahead and put the bacon in the oven. Watch it closely as its baking because with all of that translucent clay, there is a chance it might discolor, if the oven temp is off.
    Enlarge picture showing how to arrange the bacon for cooking

    34. Time to finish the eggs.

    After your egg has been baked and has cooled, dilute the amber stained glass paint with a few drops of water. Using a thin brush, gently apply the diluted paint to the edges of your egg. Think about how a fried egg looks – thin areas of the white will brown more than the others. Go lightly, and then step back to take a look. If your egg doesn’t look brown enough you can always add more paint. When you’ve finished ‘browning’ your egg, let the amber paint dry and then gently cover the surface with either clear stained glass paint or gloss varnish. I like the sheen that glass paint gives, but if you prefer varnish that’s fine. Once your eggs are painted, set aside and let them dry.
    Enlarge picture showing how to finish browning the eggs

    ALTERNATIVE TO BROWNED FRIED EGGS

    If you absolutely hate browned eggs, just leave them white and cover them over with some clear stained glass paint or gloss varnish. Let them dry and set them aside for later. I layered two eggs on top of each other in this picture because I wanted to arrange them that way on the plate, but it's probably easiest to color each egg separately then glue them on your plate.






    35. Next, move onto the potatoes. Wash your hands again because you will be working with white clay. Mix clay in these proportions. You want the potatoes to be slightly translucent and creamy in color. The best way to do this is to mix the translucent and white first, then bit by bit add the yellow until it looks like cream.
    Enlarge picture showing how clay portions to make the potatoes

    36. This is the color difference that you’re looking for. Stark white is on the left, and ‘potato cream’ is on the right.
    Enlarge picture showing clay colors for the potatoes

    37. Take a bit of the clay and roll it into a snake shape, until it is about 1/8th of an inch (3cm). Using your blade cut about 1/8 inch chunks from the snake. Roll each chunk into balls. You can make your potatoes a little larger or smaller to emulate real potatoes.
    Enlarge picture showing snake shape and size to cut

    38. Mix your yellow ochre (or golden yellow) chalk with a little bit of medium brown and using your soft brush, generously coat your potatoes.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use the chalks

    39. This is about how you want the potatoes to look. Now it’s time to bake the potatoes according to your clay’s directions. Again, about 20-25 minutes should be enough.
    Enlarge picture showing prepared potatoes

    40. After baking the bacon strips it’s time to color them so that they look crispy! Dilute some amber stained glass paint in a small bit of water and cover just the ends and sides of the bacon, where it would get browner in the skillet or broiler.
    Enlarge picture showing how to apply hightlights to the bacon

    41. Here is how I have applied the amber stained glass paint to the ends and sides of the bacon. Let the amber paint dry.
    Enlarge picture showing a different view of how to use the stained glass paints

    42. When the paint is dry, cover the entire bacon slices with clear stained glass paint for that greasy look. Set aside and let dry.
    Enlarge picture showing bacon after the clear paint has been applied

    43. Ok back to the potatoes! When your potatoes are done, take them out of the oven and let them cool just a bit. Cut the potatoes into wedges with your blade. They are easier to cut if they are a bit warm from the oven. When you’re done, just set them aside.
    Enlarge picture showing how to slice the potatoes

    44. Now it’s time to arrange the plate! I decided to use a cast iron plate for this tutorial, but any plate will do. If you want your plate to look a little greasy, I’ve found that amber stained glass paint is perfect! Just brush some on!! This is good for greasy grills, and skillets too.
    Enlarge picture showing options to prepare the plate

    45. Take your eggs and put some white glue on the back of your eggs.
    Enlarge picture showing where to put the glue

    46. Arrange your eggs, using your toothpick to overlap just a bit. If the glue squeezes out from underneath, just scrape it off with your toothpick. Its best if no glue shows.
    Enlarge picture showing how to arrange the eggs

    47. Take your bacon and put some white glue on the back of your eggs using the toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing where to put the glue

    48. Again, if glue squeezes out from underneath, just remove it with a toothpick or a pin. Put several bacon slices on the plate, and try to jumble them up – I like plates to look messy, like Mom just slapped the bacon on the plate!
    Enlarge picture showing arrangement of bacons

    49. Take some of your gloss varnish and put a drop on your plate. Start adding the potatoes bit by bit, and mix them up with a pin or toothpick to coat them with the varnish.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add the potatoes

    50. Before the varnish dries, arrange the potatoes so you see some cut surfaces, and some skin. When they varnish dries, the potatoes will be stuck to the plate.
    Enlarge picture showing how to arrange potatoes

    51. Put a drop of amber stained glass paint on your work tile and using your toothpick, put some paint on the edges of the potatoes. Just a little bit – you want them to look like parts were over browned in the skillet.
    Enlarge picture showing where to use the paint on the potatoes

    52. If you prefer not to use greenery in your miniatures you can skip this step. I like to add just a touch of color on the potatoes since everything is rather brown in this dish. Take a small bit of oregano (or whatever dried greenery or herb that you like) and grind them in the palm of your hand. While the varnish or stained glass paint is still wet, sprinkle a small amount of oregano on top of your potatoes. When the varnish is dry you can cover the herbs with another coat of gloss varnish to seal them. If you prefer, you can use chopped leaf green clay for the garnish if you don’t want to use real herbs.
    Enlarge picture showing herb additive

    53. That's it!! You have now made a complete breakfast plate for your dollhouse.
    Enlarge picture showing completed breakfast plate
    Woman of short-lived passions

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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Sculpt
    1:12 Conure Parrot
    with IGMA Fellow
    Kerri Pajutee


    Materials Needed:
    • Polymer Clay: Black (preferred)
    • Acrylic Paints
      - Black
      - Blue
      - Green
      - Orange
      - White
      - Yellow
    • Sealer: Gloss or Semi-Gloss for Eyes
    • Tools
      - Your Favorite Sculpting Tools or a Round Toothpick or Darning/Tapestry Needle
      - Tweezers
      - X-acto® Knife: #11 Blade
    • Wire: 31-32 gauge wire (0.226 - 0.200 millimeters) *also called "bead wire".
    • Paintbrush: Fine 18/0 or 10/0
    • Water: Cup
    • Baby Wipes
    • Paper Towels
    • Zap-A-Gap® (an optional gap filling formula for making wire feet)
    • Several Small Containers for Paints & Cleaning Brushes
    • Small Dish/Tile For Baking Sculpture On
    • Oven








    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of material requirements



    OVERVIEW

    This tutorial will be split into 2 separate classes: In Tutorial #1, you will learn how to sculpt the basic form of a 1:12 scale Conure Parrot from polymer clay using simple sculpting tools, as well as create and attach wire feet. You will bake/cure your polymer clay sculpt in the oven and add color using acrylic paints.

    In Tutorial #2, you will learn to cut feathers to size; make your own flocking; and glue the feathers and flock onto your parrot sculpt. There is also a tutorial on how to dye feathers and thread to use for 1:12 or smaller scale feathering and flocking.

    For this project, we will focus on the Sun Conure & Jendaya Conure Parrot.
    In nature, these birds grow to 12 inches (30cm) in length (from the beak to end of tail). Re-creating this beautiful parrot in 1:12 miniature scale presents a challenging and rewarding adventure. NOTE Because of it’s small size (the basic sculpture form is only ¾ inch in length), this tutorial will require an intermediate to advanced skill level in working with polymer clay.










    1. Before you begin the actual sculpt, you will need to print the Conure Parrot Template, see image. It will be helpful to refer back to in keeping your sculpt to scale and basic form, as you advance through the steps, and when you chose a color pattern for painting your parrot.
    Enlarge picture showing the parrot template
    TIP

    Before you start to shape your chosen brand of polymer clay, it’s a good idea to condition it first by kneading. I highly recommend using a "firm" clay such as Premo®, Kato® or "old" Fimo® Classic. Using a soft polymer clay for extreme miniature sculpts can be frustrating, as it tends to be "gum-like", stick to your fingers, and not hold it's shape during the sculpting process. If you find your clay becomes too soft and is not holding it's shape - place it in the freezer for a few minutes to firm it up before proceeding.






    2. Begin with a piece of clay about ½" x ¼" wide - as shown in the photo. For this sculpt, I chose black clay because the beak of this parrot is black and the sculpt will look more natural once the clay has been baked and cured.
    Enlarge picture showing size of ball to make the parrot

    3. Using your thumb and finger, pinch the bottom half of the clay into a "V" shape. This will help define and form the tail of your parrot.
    Enlarge picture showing how to shape the body and tail

    4. Next, gently hold the tail end and use your fingers to begin to shape the neck and head of your parrot. At this early stage, you are simply forming a basic shape.
    Enlarge picture showing how to form the basic neck and head


    5. Once you have formed the basic shape with your fingers, you may need to use your X-acto® knife to trim away any excess clay. How much clay you trim away, will depend on what your form looks like at this point. If it looks a little plump, carefully carve very small amounts of clay away until you are pleased with it. Hold your sculpt gently - try not to squeeze and use caution with the X-acto® knife - it's very sharp!
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim off excess clay


    6. After you have trimmed your desired amount of clay with the X-acto® knife, use a sculpting tool (or toothpick/cocktail stick) to continue to smooth and shape the clay. This sculpt is so delicate, that simply rolling your sculpting tool along the surface will help shape and define your parrot form.
    Enlarge picture showing how to shape and smooth

    7. Keep refining your parrot using your sculpting tool. Make sure you shape the parrot as evenly as possible on both sides. So far, this parrot's head is facing in a forward direction. Keep it pointed forward until you have finished with all the detailing. You will "pose" your parrot later.

    In this photo, I have started to define the wings. If you find that you need more clay to "build out" the sides of your parrots wings - just add a little bit (a small amount of clay at a time), then smooth your "added clay" into the parrot sculpt until you achieve a similar shape. Take your time.
    Enlarge picture showing how to define the wings

    8. Use your sculpting tool to define the area under the wings. To do this, gently scribe a line (or crease) into the clay using the tip of your sculpting tool. Make a line (or crease) on each side. Continue to work the clay, smoothing the line and defining as you go.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place a crease under the wings

    TIP

    I know it's difficult - but try not to "grip" your sculpt too tightly as you work. You don't want to damage your parrot shape and detail at this stage.






    9. Turn your sculpt to the side and check your wing lines. Do they gradually taper back as in this photo? If not, make the adjustment with the tip of your sculpting tool, then define and smooth the clay.
    Enlarge picture checking the wing lines

    10. Time to check your parrot sculpt to the example 'Conure Template' (Step 1). How does your parrot form look? From this photo, I can see that "my" parrot form is still a bit "plump", so it will need some additional trimming with the X-acto® knife. I will not extend the length of my parrot wings or tail.
    Enlarge picture to see results of the parrot shape

    11. Here I have shown where "my" parrot form was a bit "plump" compared to my scale example. In this photo, I have made yellow dotted lines to show you where I will prudently trim away the excess clay with my X-acto® knife. Once I have trimmed the excess clay away, I will smooth out the X-acto® cut and edge marks with a sculpting tool.
    Enlarge picture showing where to trim off the excess clay

    12. Next, you will begin by defining the shape of the head, cheek, throat and beak area. Start, by gently pressing into your clay sculpt with your sculpting tool. Do not apply too much pressure with your tool here -- such a tiny form calls for a very delicate touch.
    Enlarge picture showing how to define the head area

    13. Again, It helps to look at your parrot sculpt head on. Check to make sure that both sides are evenly matched. You will need to define the beak area by using the end of your sculpting tool and very lightly scribing the beak outline into the clay. First one side, then the other.
    Enlarge picture showing where to check the evenness of the head sculpt

    14. Because this parrot is an extremely small sculpt in polymer clay, it can be challenging to shape at this stage. Keep at it with the tip of your sculpting tool. Press and define until you are happy with it.
    Enlarge picture where to check shape

    15. Turn your parrot sculpt left and right as you shape the chin and beak. Keep your line detail even on both sides. Make slight adjustments if needed.
    Enlarge picture checking both sides of the head

    16. When you get the overall beak shape to where you are happy with it - then you are ready to scribe a line into the clay, detailing the upper and lower mandible (mouth). I have indicated the approximate starting point with a yellow dot in the photo example. Using the tip of your sculpting tool scribe a fine curved line. Do this on both left and right sides of the beak.
    Enlarge picture showing where to scribe the mouth

    17. Here you can see the upper and lower mandibles separated by a scribed line.
    Enlarge picture showing the scribed line

    18. A final word about the parrot beak. The upper mandible has a small, curved, sharp point to it. If you chose to, take your sculpting tool and press in this detail with the tip. If you do not want to risk messing up your beak detail at this point, wait until after you bake your sculpt and cut or carve this detail when the clay is hard.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add a curved point to the beak

    19. Now you are ready to work on the back of your parrot form. Carefully turn your sculpt over in your hand. With your sculpting tool, lightly press a "V" shape into the back. This helps to define the back of the wing area.
    Enlarge picture showing how to work detail on the back of the parrot

    20. After you have a "V" shape pressed into your clay, smooth with your sculpting tool. When you have finished defining the back of your parrot, set your sculpt aside (in a safe & dust-free place).
    Enlarge picture showing how to mark a "V" shape on the back form

    TIP

    Are you ready to make two tiny wire feet? Time to wash the polymer clay off your hands, collect your ruler, wire and scissors and lets begin.

    These next steps can be taxing as you learn how to cut, wrap and twist wire into tiny parrot feet. Making these detailed wire feet will really add to your parrot sculpt; as you will be able to position them around a perch or branch. However, if you find assembling these feet too difficult - merely replace them with two strands of twisted wire (without the toes) and advance to baking your parrot sculpt.






    21. Measure out and cut (2) 4.5" lengths of 31-32 gauge wire (0.226 - 0.200 millimeters) *also called "bead wire".
    Enlarge picture showing length of wire

    22. Parrots have a unique toe arrangement. This photo shows a typical bird toe arrangement compared to a parrot toe arrangement (2 toes forward and 2 toes back).
    Enlarge picture showing parrot feet

    23. Take your 4.5" wire strand in hand and bend into a 90 degree angle at about 1". This point will be the beginning of the leg and where you will start the first toe loop.
    Enlarge picture showing where to bend the wire

    24. You will need a toothpick or cocktail stick for this next step. Take your wire and begin to wrap it once around the toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing how to wrap the wire

    25. Make a single loop and twist the long end of your wire several times around.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make a single loop and twist

    26. Next, take a pair of tweezers and grip the long ends of the wire. Using the tip of your toothpick inserted into the loophole, twist the wire in the direction of the loop. Twist several times.

    The photo shows what twisted toe #1 should look like. You are now ready to begin toe #2.
    Enlarge picture showing where to use the tweezers and twist

    TIP

    When working with extremely fine wire, you only need to twist the wire a few times. Do not over twist (or twist too tightly) as your wire will break - and you will have to start over.






    27. To start toe #2 - take the long end of the wire and make another loop around the toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the second toe

    28. Repeating Step 24. Grip the end with tweezers, while using the tip of your toothpick inserted into the loophole. Twist the wire in the direction of the loop several times.

    Your parrot feet wire should look similar to the photo example.
    Enlarge picture showing steps using the tweezers

    29. Before beginning toe #3, bend the first two toes downward. Doing this, will give you room to complete the two remaining toes.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the third toe

    30. Begin toe #3 in the same manner as toe #1 and toe #2. Loop your wire around the toothpick and twist.
    Enlarge picture showing how to loop the wire

    31. Grip the end of toe #3 with tweezers, while using the tip of your toothpick inserted into the loophole. Twist the wire in the direction of the loop several times. You have completed toe #3 and your wire should look similar to the photo example.

    Keep with it! You have completed 3 toes so far and have one more to go!
    Enlarge picture showing the three completed toes

    32. Begin toe #4 by looping your wire around the toothpick and twist several times. You got it -- just like the previous steps, finish twisting toe #4 using the tip of your toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the fourth toe

    33. When you have completed toe #4 - your wire parrot feet should look similar to the photo example.
    Enlarge picture showing parrot foot after four toes

    34. Now, that you have "mastered" the toes, you will need to finish twisting the leg wires together. Begin, by taking the two long ends of wire and bend them upwards. The long ends of wire are marked with a yellow "X" in the example photo.
    Enlarge picture showing how to finish the leg wires

    35. To twist the two "leg" wires together - first grip the toe ends with tweezers. Next, begin to twist the two "leg" wires together. You do not have to twist all of the remaining wire lengths - only twist until your leg reaches the length of 1/2".

    Patience is key here. Take your time and do not twist too tightly or your wire may break.
    Enlarge picture showing the twisting of the wire legs

    36. Finally clip the leg wire with scissors. Do not worry if some of your toes appear longer than the others. You will "fine tune" these in the next step.
    Enlarge picture showing where to snip the wire

    TIP

    It may seem that you are "wasting" wire in this process by clipping away the excess. For this project, I thought it would be easier to use a longer wire length. As you get better at making your wire parrot feet - you may chose to cut and use a shorter length so you don't have to trim away as much excess in the end.

    In the next couple of steps, you will "fine tune" your wire parrot feet.






    37. To begin fine tuning, take hold of the twisted "leg" end with your fingers. With a pair of tweezers in hand, finish out the toes by pinching the tiny end loops flat. Pinch all four toes.
    Enlarge picture showing how to fine tune the feet

    38. Bravo! You now have one completed parrot foot. Don’t do a happy dance yet -- you still need to complete one more parrot foot. Take a breath, and go back to Steps 21 thru Step 35, repeating the entire process. Then meet me back here at STEP 37
    Enlarge picture showing one completed foot

    39. When you have completed your parrot feet, you may chose to clip the toes a bit shorter, depending on how may times you twist the wire or if one or two of your toes appear a bit longer. Just take a pair of scissors and "snip" back the toes until you are happy with the results. Be careful not to "snip" too much toe or you will have to make another foot.
    Enlarge picture showing how to clip the toes

    TIP

    If you are worried about the wire ends becoming "sharp" or unraveling after you have snipped them – no worries. You can use a very small amount of Zap-A-Gap formula applied to the toe end with the tip of a toothpick. Zap-A-Gap is like super glue – so when you use it, be careful you do not end up gluing your toothpick or fingers to your parrot foot.






    40. This photo shows two completed parrot feet, with leg ends clipped and slightly bent at an angle. You are almost ready to attach the parrot feet to your sculpt and bake. First though, you need to retrieve your parrot sculpt and make a few minor adjustments.
    Enlarge picture showing minor adjustments to the feet

    41. Alternative Parrot Feet
    O.K., so making those complicated parrot feet is just not your idea of having fun. The good news is you can "cheat" a bit here. These "cheat feet" will not have the detailed toes -- but will do in a pinch. This photo shows you how to make simple twisted wire "legs" which you can substitute for "detailed wire feet". Below are directions for making “cheat feet” (or twisted wire legs).

    1. Take a 2" wire length and bend it in half.
    2. Using your toothpick, wrap your wire.
    3. Holding the wire ends together with your fingers, begin to twist the toothpick.
    4. Clip the leg ends to a desired length.
    Enlarge picture showing an alternative method of making feet




    42. Before adding the wire feet, take your parrot sculpt in hand and very gently press into clay with your sculpting tool. This area is where you will insert the your wire feet.
    Enlarge picture showing where to indent to insert each foot

    43. Grip a completed parrot foot with your tweezers and carefully "insert" the leg end into your sculpt using an upward motion. Your parrot foot "leg ends" should not exceed ¼" in length as you may risk running the leg wire through your sculpt and out the other end. If the "leg end" wire looks too long, trim it back a bit, before you insert it. Do not trim the "leg ends" too short. If your "leg end" is too short, it will easily fall out of your sculpt after it has been baked.
    Enlarge picture showing how to insert a foot into the body

    44. Grip your second parrot foot with tweezers and repeat Step 43 by carefully inserting the leg end into your sculpt. Make sure your leg wires are evenly placed and spaced.
    Enlarge picture showing how to insert the second foot into the body

    45. After inserting your parrot feet into your sculpt, take your sculpting tool and smooth the clay around the leg. This will help secure the wire feet to your sculpt. This parrot sculpt is extremely small and the spacing between the feet is tight, so just take your time and enjoy the process.
    Enlarge picture showing how to smooth the clay around the leg

    46. Work on both of the legs evenly, smooth the clay using the end of your sculpting tool.
    Enlarge picture showing where to smooth the clay

    47. Finally, make sure that your parrot feet are even before you place your sculpt in the oven. Now is the time to make any last adjustments to the unbaked clay form.
    Enlarge picture showing spacing of feet

    TIP

    You are the artist! If you chose to, this is the time to give your miniature parrot some personality. To accomplish this, you can ever-so-gently hold your sculpt with one hand, and using the other hand, tilt your parrot head to the left or right before you bake.






    48. PREHEAT your oven per the manufacturers recommendations for your polymer clay. Place your sculpt on a tile or oven-safe dish and bake (10-15 minutes or per your polymer clay package instructions). Use an oven thermometer, if possible and keep an eye on the temperature. This is a tiny sculpt so take caution and do not over bake. Oh yes, don’t forget to wash your hands after handling the polymer clay.

    After your parrot sculpt has baked/cured in the oven and cooled, you are ready to add color with acrylic paints.
    Enlarge picture showing preparation before baking

    49. Optional Carving Details
    After baking/curing your sculpt in the oven and it has cooled, you may chose to carve a little more detail into your sculpture. You may want to shape the beak a bit more or define lines by carefully carving with an X-acto® knife or other carving tools.

    In the example photo, I decided to carve a little more detail into the cured sculpt with a Rio Rondo Carbide scraper tip. I wanted to define the beak point and wing lines. Personally, I find it is easier to grip your sculpture as you "carve" super-fine detail (like the pointed tip of the beak) into the oven-hardened clay sculpt -- rather than try and refine these details when the clay is "un-baked" and soft.
    Enlarge picture showing optional carving details




    TIP

    If after baking your parrot sculpt -- you notice that the wire feet are loose or "wobbly", you can secure them into place by using a small amount of Zap-A-Gap® on the tip of a toothpick. It only takes a very small amount of Zap-A-Gap® between the clay & wire (where the feet are inserted into the clay).






    50. Ready to add color. After you have finished baking, cooling and carving any additional detail into your sculpt -- gather up your paints and brushes. You are ready to add some brilliant color to your parrot.
    Enlarge picture preparing to add color

    51. You are ready to add some color and personality to your parrot sculpt? First, you may want to refer to your Conure Template and chose which Conure color pattern (Sun or Jendaya) you wish to paint.

    A Sun Conure has more yellow & orange that extends down the back and over the top of the wings. The Jendaya Conure has more green on it's wings and the yellow does not extend down the back. For these photos, I have chosen the Jendaya pattern and will paint with yellow and green acrylics using a fine paintbrush.
    Enlarge picture showing where to paint

    TIP

    If you already have your feathers and thread handy for Class 2, it's a good idea to match your acrylic paint color to the feather and thread colors.






    52. Now, you need to apply paint to the wire feet. I recommend using an enamel paint (gray in color -- or a mixture of black and white) on the wire. If you do not have any enamel paint, but chose to use acrylic paint on the feet, it may "flake off" of the wire when you bend or pose the parrot feet.
    Enlarge picture showing how to paint the parrot feet

    53. Before painting the eyes, it's a good idea to check the eye placement and color by referring back to your Conure Template. Both the Sun Conure & Jendaya Conure have a white-colored circle of skin around their eye. Paint this white circle first. Once the white has dried, paint the "eyeball" by taking a fine paintbrush and place a dot of black onto the white circle.

    If you have used black clay for your sculpt, you do not need to paint the beak. If you think the black clay looks "too dull", just apply a thin coat of matte sealer.
    Enlarge picture showing where to paint the eyes

    TIP

    If you want a "shiny" eye, simply place a drop of gloss sealer over the black dot. If you do not have any gloss sealer, you can chose to use black enamel paint for the eyes. I find that a "shiny" eye really brings a parrot sculpt to "life".







    This is the end of Tutorial 1
    You have finished your basic parrot sculpt; made the wire feet and attached them to your sculpt; baked/cured your parrot in the oven, and finally painted it with acrylics & enamel. Congratulations! You are ready to move on to the Feather & Flock phase in Class 2. This final phase is where your miniature Conure Parrot will really take shape and come alive!

    Reminder
    Before beginning Part 2 of this Tutorial, please review your materials list. The most important item is your feather choice. Your feathers should have a very fine, hair-like "rachis" or "spine". Dyed hen saddle feathers are the right size and work very well for this project. The initial materials list calls for 20 small feathers, however, in reality you will only use 10 or less after they have been cut-to-size. If you have never cut feathers to size before, it is best to have a few extra available to “practice” on.

    Try the Tutorial to dye your own feathers and thread to use for 1:12 or smaller scale feathering and flocking. Continue to Part 2, Learn To Flock and Feather a Parrot.







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    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Flock and Feather
    1:12 Conure Parrot
    with IGMA Fellow
    Kerri Pajutee


    Materials Needed:
    • Feathers: 10-15 Green
    • Cotton, Silk or Poly Thread: DMC Cotton Embroider thread or Sewing Thread
    • Scissors
    • Ruler
    • Paintbrush: Fine 10/0
    • Tools
      - Toothpick
      - Darning Needle or Small Spoon-Tool
      - X-acto© Knife: #11 Blade
      - Tweezers
    • Glue: Hob-e-Tac Adhesive© or Tacky Glue
    • Water: Cup
    • Baby Wipes
    • Paper Towels
    • Several Small Containers for Holding Feathers and Flock






    OVERVIEW

    In this tutorial #2 you will learn to cut feathers to size and make your own flocking (from thread). You will learn how to apply feathers to the wings and tail, along with flocking to the rest of your 1:12 parrot sculpt (from Tutorial #1) using glue, a small paint brush and tweezers.

    Your feather and thread colors will depend on which Conure parrot you choose to make. Both the Sun Conure and the Jandaya Conure are similar in wing and tail colors (green and blue), however, if you choose a Sun Conure, you will need a bit more yellow and orange.

    If you cannot find commercially-dyed feathers for this project, you may chose to dye your own feathers and thread to use for 1:12 or smaller scale feathering and flocking.










    1. This photo shows a variety of feathers that would work for this project. On the left are dyed turkey flats and hen saddle feathers. The feathers on the right are from a sun conure parrot (I have a friend that owns one of these birds and she collects the feathers for me when her bird sheds/molts).
    Enlarge picture showing types of feathers

    TIP

    For this project, I chose a mixture of dyed hen saddle feathers and a few real conure feathers. The most important thing to remember when choosing your feathers for creating miniature feathered birds is the size of your feather rachis or spine. You want to chose feathers with a hair-fine spine. If the spine is too thick, it will not look natural, and will be too thick and stiff when applying to your parrot.






    2. Grip the feather in one hand and begin trimming the right side from the tip upward. Work slowly, and carefully cut in a straight line following the spine. Sharp scissors and steady hand work best. Don't get discouraged if your feather looks a bit "ragged" at first. Cutting a smooth, straight line across the vanes takes practice. The more feathers you cut, the more confident you will become.
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim the right side of the feather

    3. After you have trimmed the right side - turn your feather over in your hand, and begin trimming the left side. Trim from the tip upward. Make sure you trim the feather with both sides an even distance from the center spine. You want to trim your feathers down to approximately 1/16" in width if possible.
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim the left side of the feather


    4. You may need to trim the tips of your feathers after you cut them to size. To do this, carefully round the tip using your scissors.
    Enlarge picture showing how round the feather tips


    5. After you finish trimming, your cut feather should look like.
    Enlarge picture showing progress of cut feather

    6. You will need to save some of your feather trimmings. These trimmings come in handy as fill-ins when you glue your feathers onto your parrot sculpt.
    Enlarge picture showing saved feather pieces

    7. To use your trimmings you can carefully take your tweezers and gently pull apart the vanes to the width you choose. These trimmings work nicely when a full feather is just too much.
    Enlarge picture showing how to separate the vanes of the feather

    8. Continue to trim all your feathers and set aside. You will need approximately 10-15 cut feathers. As you can see from the photo, much of the original feather vanes have been cut away. After you have cut all your feathers to "size" you may want to go back to trim and reshape some of the "ragged" edges on a few.
    Enlarge picture showing where to trim

    TIP

    With this project, you will find that you may end up not using all your cut-to-size feathers for your parrot sculpt -- but its nice to be able to pick the "best" ones from the bunch you have trimmed up.

    For now, leave your feather lengths as is and set them aside. You will clip actual lengths you need to use, when you begin to attach the feathers to your parrot sculpt with glue.






    9. Set your cut feathers aside to a safe (draft-free area), you are ready to make your own flocking. Before you can cut your thread into flocking, you will need to unwind a fair amount of length from the spool (if you are using sewing thread), wrap this around your fingers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to start making flock

    10. When you have finished wrapping the thread around your fingers, cut the thread from the spool and set the spool aside.
    Enlarge picture showing how to wrap the thread

    11. Slip your index finger out from under the wound loop and cut ends in half with scissors.
    Enlarge picture showing how where to cut the thread

    12. Pinch the thread ends together and begin to cut the thread as fine as you can into a container. The finer the "cut - the better the flock. Your flock should resemble "fluffy powder".
    Enlarge picture showing how to cut the thread

    13. Making your own flock is a tedious process. Remember...don't rush it. Try to cut a fine, consistent length with every clip. To fluff it up a bit in the container, gently stir with a toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing the flock

    TIP

    How much flock and how many different colors you cut will depend on which conure pattern you chose. If you are making a Jendaya conure you will only need a small amount of green and yellow. If you want to make a sun conure, you may want to cut some additional orange or red-orange.






    14. Cut enough flock to generously cover the areas of color on your parrot sculpt. Store your cut flocking in a small container with a lid and set aside. This photo actually shows much more than what you will need (but it makes for a nice, colorful photo). You are now finished with cutting your thread into flocking. Set aside.
    Enlarge picture showing flock colors you will need

    15. You will now begin applying feathers to your parrot sculpt. To begin the feathering process, you need a ruler and scissors to trim-to-length the tail feathers. Start by cutting 4 feathers at approximately inch in length.
    Enlarge picture showing feather preparation

    A WORD OR TWO ABOUT THE GLUE

    For this project, I am using Hob-e-Tac by Woodland Scenics. It is water-soluble, goes on white and sets up to a clear tacky in a couple of minutes. The feathers adhere to it very nicely and I do not have to wait for each stage or layer of feathers to dry completely before moving on to the next stage or layer of feathers (which I would have to do if I were using a craft glue like Aleenes Tacky glue).

    The one drawback with using Hob-e-Tac is that you need to close up the bottle lid with each application otherwise the entire bottle will begin to set up and, you need to wash your paintbrush (with water) after each glue application (if you fail to wash your paintbrush, the glue it will set up on it yuk!).

    O.K., enough preaching on gluelets get started.






    16. Use any glue you do use sparingly! If you use too much glue it will seep or bleed through your feathers and show when dry.
    Enlarge picture showing type of glue

    17. Take your parrot sculpt in hand and apply the glue onto the tail section.
    Enlarge picture showing where to glue to the tail area

    18. The placement of the red dots in this diagram shows where the first 3 tail feathers will be placed onto your parrot sculpt.
    Enlarge picture showing diagram for first tail feather placements

    19. With a pair of tweezers, apply the first tail feather. Gently press the feather into the glue to set. Remember not to use too much glue here or it will bleed through your feather.
    Enlarge picture showing first feather

    20. Apply the second tail feather with your tweezers and gently press into the glue to set.
    Enlarge picture showing first feather

    TIP

    If you are using a water-based craft glue like Aleenes Tacky glue or other, you will need to pause and wait between feather layer applications. For example, you can glue the top portion of the tail then wait a bit to let that dry before turning your parrot over and starting on the underside. This will give the glued feathers a chance to set up and dry.

    If you rush ahead, you may end up shifting your feathers or pressing too hard into the wet glue with your fingers (trying to hold on to your tiny parrot). Sometimes the glue will bleed through and discolor the feather turning it darker or lighter when dry. The best way to avoid this is 1) not to apply the glue to thick; 2) dont press the feather too hard into the glue; and 3) let it dry between handling and adding another layer of feathers.






    21. Before applying feather #3, you may need to add a tiny bit of glue to set the feather to the top-middle portion of your parrot tail.
    Enlarge picture showing where to glue before continuing

    22. Apply the third feather with your tweezers and press to set into the glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply the third feather

    TIP

    Use just a bit of pressure to "place" the feather. Once it is where you want it, gently "press" it into place with tweezers. You can also lightly touch it with your finger too - to "tap/press" it into place.






    23. Now, turn your parrot over in your hand and lets begin to apply some feathers to the underside of the tail section. Apply some glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue to the back of the tail

    TIP

    I use Aleene's Tacky glue on other animal flocking/furring projects - but not for birds (feathers). The Hob-e-Tac will set up clear and will grab the feathers just right (with a little practice). You still need to be careful not to "squish" or "mash" down on your newly placed feathers.






    24. Remember when I mentioned earlier in the tutorial, that you need to keep some of your feather trimmings. Here is an opportunity to apply some. With your tweezers, you will place a small strip of feather trimmings to both left and right sides of the underside of your parrot tail.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply feather trimmings

    25. Applying additional fillers. These feather trimmings are perfect feather fillers because they do not have a spine.
    Enlarge picture showing additional feather trimmings



    Q: It also appears that you are bending the spine of the feathers like this ) instead of a straight line from top to bottom

    A: No bending. It may be that you are seeing how the "hen saddle" type of feather slightly curves a bit. It's best to have a straighter feather spine.






    26. Take your fourth and final tail feather and apply it in the middle of the underside of the tail section. This feather should slightly overlap your feather trimmings. Gently push the feather into the glue to set.

    Bravo! You are finished with feathering the tail section of your parrot. Set your parrot sculpt aside, as you will now start to trim the wing feathers for application.
    Enlarge picture showing the final tail feather application

    BEFORE THE NEXT STEP

    You will trim two (2) sets of wing feathers. First, the primaries (the longer wing tip feathers), and second, the primary-coverts (the smaller, second row of overlapping feathers).

    Cut 8 primary wing feathers approximately 3/8 to less than inch in length (depending on the actual size of your parrot sculpt). If you are not sure, trim a feather and hold it up to where you would glue it to your parrot wing and gauge the length from there.

    Next, cut 8-10 primary-covert wing feathers approximately inch or less in length. Again, use your judgment, depending on the size of your actual parrot sculpt. You will use these tiny feathers as a second row, by applying them to just barely overlap your first row of longer primary feathers. If you are creating a sun conure color pattern, you will want to cut some yellow primary coverts (shown in the photo).






    27. In this photo, I have cut feathers of different colors (green, light green & yellow). Again, if you chose to make a sun conure parrot, you will need some yellow primary-covert feathers. If you are making a jendaya conure you can cut all green feathers.
    Enlarge picture showing different colors of feathers

    28. The following diagram shows approximately where you will glue your 4 primary wing feathers.
    Enlarge picture showing the wing diagram

    29. Begin by applying a small amount of glue along the wing as shown in photo.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue to the wing

    30. With your tweezers take one of the long primary feathers and place it onto the wing glue (at an angle). Press gently to set. It might be easier to hold you parrot by the head during this process being careful not to get your fingers into the glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place the primary feather

    31. Once the first wing feather is in place, pick up the second primary feather with your tweezers and set it into the glue next to the first feather. Your feather should slightly overlap the previous feather.
    Enlarge picture showing the placement of the second feather

    32. Repeat this process with the next two feathers so you have a total of four primary feathers on each wing.
    Enlarge picture showing the repeat process

    33. Once you have all four primary feathers in place on one side you will want to repeat the steps on the other. Holding your parrot by its head (so as not to press into your glued wing feathers) -- apply the glue. With your tweezers take one of the long primary feathers and place it into the glue (at an angle crossing over the first set of wing feathers. See photo example. Press gently to set.
    Enlarge picture showing placement of feathers

    34. Continue to apply the remaining three primary feathers into place (slightly overlapping them).
    Enlarge picture continuing to apply the remaining three primary feathers

    35. When you are finished, you should have four primaries feathers on each wing.
    Enlarge picture showing four primaries feathers

    36. Once you have all your primary feathers in place, its time to add the smaller primary-covert feathers. These feathers will be glued to the wings above the primary feathers. This second row of feathers will consist of at least 4 on each side. If you are creating a sun conure this row should be yellow. If you are making a jendaya color pattern this row will be green. Apply glue.
    Enlarge picture showing placement of smaller primary-covert feathers

    37. With tweezers place a primary-covert feather onto the glue, just slightly overlapping your primary row. Continue to apply these feathers, one by one, until you have placed all four. You can use your tweezer ends or finger to gently press into the glue to set. See photo example.
    Enlarge picture showing placement of smaller primary-covert feathers

    TIP

    Depending on the size of your parrot, you may decide that you want to add one or two more primary-covert feathers. If you notice that you have areas on the wing that look as if they need another feather or two just trim a few more and add them where needed. You are the artist!






    38. Once you have finished applying the primary-covert feathers on the first wing You will need to repeat the same process on the other wing. First apply the glue. Then with your tweezers place a small primary-covert onto the glue, slightly overlapping the first row of primary feathers. With tweezers, place the second, third & final fourth feather into place. Here I have selected a Jendaya conure color pattern - so I have placed both primary & primary-covert feathers in green.
    Enlarge picture showing the repeat process of Step 36

    TIP

    You may feel that your parrots wing does not need to be trimmed with an X-acto knife at this stage thats O.K. I do this to remove any bulk feathers and uneven edges before I glue the next layer of feathers and flock. Use your own judgment its your parrot sculpt!






    39. If you have finished applying both primary & primary-covert feathers to your parrots wings, you are ready to "clean up or trim" your feather spines and lines before moving on to the next step. To do this, take an X-acto knife and very gently press/score (trim) the upper tips (edges) of your primary-covert feathers. Be very careful here that you do not press too hard and cut through your sculpt or your hand. If you are using a new, sharp blade, it will not take much pressure.
    Enlarge picture showing how to clean up the feather spines

    40. After the feathers have been scored/cut remove excess feathers and glue with tweezers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use your tweezers

    TIP

    Now, to add a final thin layer of feather trimmings onto the back of your parrot wings. This is not a necessary step, but I like to finish out my wing feathers by taking a small piece of trim and overlapping my last layer of primary-coverts (on each upper wing). This feather technique looks especially nice if you are making a larger parrot like a Macaw.






    41. Apply a bit of glue in a "V" shape as shown.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue on the back

    42. Take a small end section of a feather trimming and place over the glued area. It should overlap just a bit onto the primary-covert layer.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place the feather trimming

    43. Do this on both wings. Because I am making a Jendaya color pattern this trimming is shown in green. However, if you are making a sun conure pattern you would want this feather trimming to be yellow.
    Enlarge picture showing the repeated process on the other side

    44. If you should have any overlap of trimming (and you will probably have a small amount) - you can simply score and trim away using your X-acto knife.
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim away overlap

    45. Finally, you will finish up the feather process by turning your parrot over and working on the underside of each wing. Depending on how deep you made your crease detail (under each wing) on your original parrot sculpt, will determine how much feather trimming you will use here. If you do not have any wing crease detail, then skip this step.

    Apply a very small amount of glue using a fine brush. With your tweezers, take a thin amount of feather trimmings and place onto glue. You may want to take a toothpick and gently press the feather trimming into the crease. Repeat on other wing. Trim away any excess "top" length with X-acto knife or scissors.
    Enlarge picture showing how to feather the under wing




    TIP

    One of the hardest parts about feathering and flocking such a small parrot is handling it gently while you work. It's easy to mess up the feathers or grip too tightly and squish both feathers and glue. If you have to wait a bit until the glue has a chance to dry - the better. If you end up totally screwing up one or two of your feathers in the process - replace them before moving on to flocking.






    46. You will need to retrieve your flocking and prepare it for gluing onto your parrot. Take your flocking and pinch a bunch with your tweezers.
    Enlarge picture on retrieving the flock

    47. Place this flock onto a clean, dust/lint-free work area. You want your parrot flock to be free of various bits of stuff (like hair, pieces of trimmed feathers, etc.)
    Enlarge picture showing prepared work area

    48. Take your finger and tap the flocking as flat as you can. This makes it easier to pick up with the tweezers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to tap the flock flat

    TIP

    Start with your parrots tail base, legs & chest area first. I have chosen the Jendaya color pattern, so my parrot has a little green on its lower parts then transitions to yellow on the chest. If you have chosen a sun conure this area can be done in all yellow flock.






    49. Apply a small amount of Hob-e-Tac glue. It helps to hold your parrot sculpt by the head during this process - so as not to damage your newly feathered areas by gripping too hard. With your tweezers pick up some flocking (a even, thin layer) and apply it to the glue. Cover the area as evenly as you can with flock. You may need to apply a couple of tweezer-loads, but keep them as thin a layer as possible. If you place a bulk of flock onto the glue, you are more apt to have a lumpy parrot.

    Gently and evenly press the flocking into the glue to set using the end of your tweezers, toothpick, a sculpting spoon type tool, or fingers. Blow or very lightly "brush" away any excess flock using a paintbrush or micro-tip applicator before applying more glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply the green flock




    50. I have applied the green flocking to the bottom area and will transition to yellow flocking from the chest upward to the neck and head area. Work one small section at a time this will keep your fingers out of the glue.
    Enlarge picture showing how to transition to yellow flocking

    TIP

    I like to use a micro-tip applicator for removing any excess flocking that remains stubborn and will not blow away. The excess flock tends to "stick" to the applicator brush. When removing excess flock - work very delicately, you do not want to remove to much or the glue will start to show. If you remove or brush away too much flock - just add a bit more glue and flock to the area and press.






    51. Slowly work up the neck and head area of your parrot with glue, then flocking. Blow away any excess before you begin to add glue to a new section. Press the flock into the glue evenly and smoothly. I usually finish the underside first, then turn my parrot over and work on the back of wings and neck and head area.
    Enlarge picture showing how you work the flock up the neck and head

    52. Turn your parrot over. During this stage of flocking, I find it helps to hold the parrots feet. Apply a small amount of glue on the back of the wings. Most of your wings are already covered in feather, except for the upper portion. I have chosen a Jendaya color pattern so this section is green flocking. If you are making a sun conure color pattern, this would be yellow flocking.

    After you have evenly covered the glue with flock, press into the glue using your finger or tool of your choice. You want it to be smooth and even -- then blow, or brush away the excess before moving onto the final neck and head area.
    Enlarge picture showing the final placement of flock on the underside




    53. Continue to hold your parrots feet, resting it onto your fingers. Apply glue to the neck and head area. Be careful not to apply any glue around the white eye area and beak. With your tweezers place some flock evenly and press using your fingers or tool of choice. Work slowly around the delicate eye and beak. If you do happen to get glue or flock onto these areas, just dip a paintbrush in a little water and wipe away. You can also use the tip of your tweezers and lift or push away the excess (but I prefer a moist, fine-tipped paintbrush (or microtip applicator) as it tends to grab the flocking and glue better). When you have finished pressing your flock into the glue evenly and smoothly -- blow or brush away the excess.
    Enlarge picture showing how flock is applied to the head area

    SOME FINAL DETAILS ABOUT COLOR

    After flocking using either yellow or a combination of yellow and green (jendaya), you may chose to add a splash of dark orange or orange-red coloring to your parrot. Both the Jendaya & Sun conure have some of these colors (See Tutorial #1 color template for both Sun and Jendaya Conure examples).






    54. There are several ways you can add this additional color. First, you can trim a tiny amount of orange or orange-red thread into flocking and apply with glue. I prefer this method when working on a larger parrot like a macaw.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add color

    55. You can also apply this color using a micro-tip fiber applicator and a soft chalk pastel. Rub a small amount of chalk pastel onto your micro tip and apply it to the flocking. For my Jendaya conure, I used a dark orange as well as a cobalt blue on the mid-wing section.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use a micro-tip applicator

    56. If you chose to use pastels on your flocking, you will need to spray a fixative onto the surface to keep it from smearing or coming off when handled. After applying chalk pastel colors to the flocking, I will spray a very light coat of alcohol-free, hairspray onto my parrot to set the color. WARNING Do not use too much hairspray, or it will darken or spot your feathers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use chalks

    57. Here is my little Jendaya Conure, who measures 1 inch in length from beak to tail.
    Enlarge picture showing completed Jendaya Conure

    58. You have completed your Conure! I hope you had as much fun with this project as I did.
    Enlarge picture showing different angle of completed Jendaya Conure


    This is the end of Tutorial 2
    You have finished your basic parrot sculpt; made the wire feet and attached them to your sculpt; baked/cured your parrot in the oven, and finally painted it with acrylics & enamel. Congratulations! You are ready to move on to the Feather & Flock phase in Class 2. This final phase is where your miniature Conure Parrot will really take shape and come alive!
    Woman of short-lived passions

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