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Chủ đề: Làm động vật bằng đất sét

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    Làm động vật bằng đất sét

    Lần sửa cuối bởi obaasan, ngày 17-07-2012 lúc 06:10 PM.
    Woman of short-lived passions

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    Re: Làm động vật bằng đất sét

    Polymer Clay Tutorial - How to make a Rabbit or Bunny Figurine

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    Re: Làm động vật bằng đất sét

    Polymer Clay Tutorial - How to Make a Puppy Dog

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    Re: Làm động vật bằng đất sét

    Polymer Clay Tutorial - How to Make Kitty Cat



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    Re: Làm động vật bằng đất sét

    How to Make a Polymer Clay Dalmatian

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    Re: Làm động vật bằng đất sét

    Learn To Sculpt
    1:12 Conure Parrot
    with IGMA Fellow
    Kerri Pajutee


    Materials Needed:
    • Polymer Clay: Black (preferred)
    • Acrylic Paints
      - Black
      - Blue
      - Green
      - Orange
      - White
      - Yellow
    • Sealer: Gloss or Semi-Gloss for Eyes
    • Tools
      - Your Favorite Sculpting Tools or a Round Toothpick or Darning/Tapestry Needle
      - Tweezers
      - X-acto® Knife: #11 Blade
    • Wire: 31-32 gauge wire (0.226 - 0.200 millimeters) *also called "bead wire".
    • Paintbrush: Fine 18/0 or 10/0
    • Water: Cup
    • Baby Wipes
    • Paper Towels
    • Zap-A-Gap® (an optional gap filling formula for making wire feet)
    • Several Small Containers for Paints & Cleaning Brushes
    • Small Dish/Tile For Baking Sculpture On
    • Oven








    Close-up images of materials needed
    Enlarge picture of material requirements



    OVERVIEW

    This tutorial will be split into 2 separate classes: In Tutorial #1, you will learn how to sculpt the basic form of a 1:12 scale Conure Parrot from polymer clay using simple sculpting tools, as well as create and attach wire feet. You will bake/cure your polymer clay sculpt in the oven and add color using acrylic paints.

    In Tutorial #2, you will learn to cut feathers to size; make your own flocking; and glue the feathers and flock onto your parrot sculpt. There is also a tutorial on how to dye feathers and thread to use for 1:12 or smaller scale feathering and flocking.

    For this project, we will focus on the Sun Conure & Jendaya Conure Parrot.
    In nature, these birds grow to 12 inches (30cm) in length (from the beak to end of tail). Re-creating this beautiful parrot in 1:12 miniature scale presents a challenging and rewarding adventure. NOTE Because of it’s small size (the basic sculpture form is only ¾ inch in length), this tutorial will require an intermediate to advanced skill level in working with polymer clay.










    1. Before you begin the actual sculpt, you will need to print the Conure Parrot Template, see image. It will be helpful to refer back to in keeping your sculpt to scale and basic form, as you advance through the steps, and when you chose a color pattern for painting your parrot.
    Enlarge picture showing the parrot template
    TIP

    Before you start to shape your chosen brand of polymer clay, it’s a good idea to condition it first by kneading. I highly recommend using a "firm" clay such as Premo®, Kato® or "old" Fimo® Classic. Using a soft polymer clay for extreme miniature sculpts can be frustrating, as it tends to be "gum-like", stick to your fingers, and not hold it's shape during the sculpting process. If you find your clay becomes too soft and is not holding it's shape - place it in the freezer for a few minutes to firm it up before proceeding.






    2. Begin with a piece of clay about ½" x ¼" wide - as shown in the photo. For this sculpt, I chose black clay because the beak of this parrot is black and the sculpt will look more natural once the clay has been baked and cured.
    Enlarge picture showing size of ball to make the parrot

    3. Using your thumb and finger, pinch the bottom half of the clay into a "V" shape. This will help define and form the tail of your parrot.
    Enlarge picture showing how to shape the body and tail

    4. Next, gently hold the tail end and use your fingers to begin to shape the neck and head of your parrot. At this early stage, you are simply forming a basic shape.
    Enlarge picture showing how to form the basic neck and head


    5. Once you have formed the basic shape with your fingers, you may need to use your X-acto® knife to trim away any excess clay. How much clay you trim away, will depend on what your form looks like at this point. If it looks a little plump, carefully carve very small amounts of clay away until you are pleased with it. Hold your sculpt gently - try not to squeeze and use caution with the X-acto® knife - it's very sharp!
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim off excess clay


    6. After you have trimmed your desired amount of clay with the X-acto® knife, use a sculpting tool (or toothpick/cocktail stick) to continue to smooth and shape the clay. This sculpt is so delicate, that simply rolling your sculpting tool along the surface will help shape and define your parrot form.
    Enlarge picture showing how to shape and smooth

    7. Keep refining your parrot using your sculpting tool. Make sure you shape the parrot as evenly as possible on both sides. So far, this parrot's head is facing in a forward direction. Keep it pointed forward until you have finished with all the detailing. You will "pose" your parrot later.

    In this photo, I have started to define the wings. If you find that you need more clay to "build out" the sides of your parrots wings - just add a little bit (a small amount of clay at a time), then smooth your "added clay" into the parrot sculpt until you achieve a similar shape. Take your time.
    Enlarge picture showing how to define the wings

    8. Use your sculpting tool to define the area under the wings. To do this, gently scribe a line (or crease) into the clay using the tip of your sculpting tool. Make a line (or crease) on each side. Continue to work the clay, smoothing the line and defining as you go.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place a crease under the wings

    TIP

    I know it's difficult - but try not to "grip" your sculpt too tightly as you work. You don't want to damage your parrot shape and detail at this stage.






    9. Turn your sculpt to the side and check your wing lines. Do they gradually taper back as in this photo? If not, make the adjustment with the tip of your sculpting tool, then define and smooth the clay.
    Enlarge picture checking the wing lines

    10. Time to check your parrot sculpt to the example 'Conure Template' (Step 1). How does your parrot form look? From this photo, I can see that "my" parrot form is still a bit "plump", so it will need some additional trimming with the X-acto® knife. I will not extend the length of my parrot wings or tail.
    Enlarge picture to see results of the parrot shape

    11. Here I have shown where "my" parrot form was a bit "plump" compared to my scale example. In this photo, I have made yellow dotted lines to show you where I will prudently trim away the excess clay with my X-acto® knife. Once I have trimmed the excess clay away, I will smooth out the X-acto® cut and edge marks with a sculpting tool.
    Enlarge picture showing where to trim off the excess clay

    12. Next, you will begin by defining the shape of the head, cheek, throat and beak area. Start, by gently pressing into your clay sculpt with your sculpting tool. Do not apply too much pressure with your tool here -- such a tiny form calls for a very delicate touch.
    Enlarge picture showing how to define the head area

    13. Again, It helps to look at your parrot sculpt head on. Check to make sure that both sides are evenly matched. You will need to define the beak area by using the end of your sculpting tool and very lightly scribing the beak outline into the clay. First one side, then the other.
    Enlarge picture showing where to check the evenness of the head sculpt

    14. Because this parrot is an extremely small sculpt in polymer clay, it can be challenging to shape at this stage. Keep at it with the tip of your sculpting tool. Press and define until you are happy with it.
    Enlarge picture where to check shape

    15. Turn your parrot sculpt left and right as you shape the chin and beak. Keep your line detail even on both sides. Make slight adjustments if needed.
    Enlarge picture checking both sides of the head

    16. When you get the overall beak shape to where you are happy with it - then you are ready to scribe a line into the clay, detailing the upper and lower mandible (mouth). I have indicated the approximate starting point with a yellow dot in the photo example. Using the tip of your sculpting tool scribe a fine curved line. Do this on both left and right sides of the beak.
    Enlarge picture showing where to scribe the mouth

    17. Here you can see the upper and lower mandibles separated by a scribed line.
    Enlarge picture showing the scribed line

    18. A final word about the parrot beak. The upper mandible has a small, curved, sharp point to it. If you chose to, take your sculpting tool and press in this detail with the tip. If you do not want to risk messing up your beak detail at this point, wait until after you bake your sculpt and cut or carve this detail when the clay is hard.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add a curved point to the beak

    19. Now you are ready to work on the back of your parrot form. Carefully turn your sculpt over in your hand. With your sculpting tool, lightly press a "V" shape into the back. This helps to define the back of the wing area.
    Enlarge picture showing how to work detail on the back of the parrot

    20. After you have a "V" shape pressed into your clay, smooth with your sculpting tool. When you have finished defining the back of your parrot, set your sculpt aside (in a safe & dust-free place).
    Enlarge picture showing how to mark a "V" shape on the back form

    TIP

    Are you ready to make two tiny wire feet? Time to wash the polymer clay off your hands, collect your ruler, wire and scissors and lets begin.

    These next steps can be taxing as you learn how to cut, wrap and twist wire into tiny parrot feet. Making these detailed wire feet will really add to your parrot sculpt; as you will be able to position them around a perch or branch. However, if you find assembling these feet too difficult - merely replace them with two strands of twisted wire (without the toes) and advance to baking your parrot sculpt.






    21. Measure out and cut (2) 4.5" lengths of 31-32 gauge wire (0.226 - 0.200 millimeters) *also called "bead wire".
    Enlarge picture showing length of wire

    22. Parrots have a unique toe arrangement. This photo shows a typical bird toe arrangement compared to a parrot toe arrangement (2 toes forward and 2 toes back).
    Enlarge picture showing parrot feet

    23. Take your 4.5" wire strand in hand and bend into a 90 degree angle at about 1". This point will be the beginning of the leg and where you will start the first toe loop.
    Enlarge picture showing where to bend the wire

    24. You will need a toothpick or cocktail stick for this next step. Take your wire and begin to wrap it once around the toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing how to wrap the wire

    25. Make a single loop and twist the long end of your wire several times around.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make a single loop and twist

    26. Next, take a pair of tweezers and grip the long ends of the wire. Using the tip of your toothpick inserted into the loophole, twist the wire in the direction of the loop. Twist several times.

    The photo shows what twisted toe #1 should look like. You are now ready to begin toe #2.
    Enlarge picture showing where to use the tweezers and twist

    TIP

    When working with extremely fine wire, you only need to twist the wire a few times. Do not over twist (or twist too tightly) as your wire will break - and you will have to start over.






    27. To start toe #2 - take the long end of the wire and make another loop around the toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the second toe

    28. Repeating Step 24. Grip the end with tweezers, while using the tip of your toothpick inserted into the loophole. Twist the wire in the direction of the loop several times.

    Your parrot feet wire should look similar to the photo example.
    Enlarge picture showing steps using the tweezers

    29. Before beginning toe #3, bend the first two toes downward. Doing this, will give you room to complete the two remaining toes.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the third toe

    30. Begin toe #3 in the same manner as toe #1 and toe #2. Loop your wire around the toothpick and twist.
    Enlarge picture showing how to loop the wire

    31. Grip the end of toe #3 with tweezers, while using the tip of your toothpick inserted into the loophole. Twist the wire in the direction of the loop several times. You have completed toe #3 and your wire should look similar to the photo example.

    Keep with it! You have completed 3 toes so far and have one more to go!
    Enlarge picture showing the three completed toes

    32. Begin toe #4 by looping your wire around the toothpick and twist several times. You got it -- just like the previous steps, finish twisting toe #4 using the tip of your toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing how to make the fourth toe

    33. When you have completed toe #4 - your wire parrot feet should look similar to the photo example.
    Enlarge picture showing parrot foot after four toes

    34. Now, that you have "mastered" the toes, you will need to finish twisting the leg wires together. Begin, by taking the two long ends of wire and bend them upwards. The long ends of wire are marked with a yellow "X" in the example photo.
    Enlarge picture showing how to finish the leg wires

    35. To twist the two "leg" wires together - first grip the toe ends with tweezers. Next, begin to twist the two "leg" wires together. You do not have to twist all of the remaining wire lengths - only twist until your leg reaches the length of 1/2".

    Patience is key here. Take your time and do not twist too tightly or your wire may break.
    Enlarge picture showing the twisting of the wire legs

    36. Finally clip the leg wire with scissors. Do not worry if some of your toes appear longer than the others. You will "fine tune" these in the next step.
    Enlarge picture showing where to snip the wire

    TIP

    It may seem that you are "wasting" wire in this process by clipping away the excess. For this project, I thought it would be easier to use a longer wire length. As you get better at making your wire parrot feet - you may chose to cut and use a shorter length so you don't have to trim away as much excess in the end.

    In the next couple of steps, you will "fine tune" your wire parrot feet.






    37. To begin fine tuning, take hold of the twisted "leg" end with your fingers. With a pair of tweezers in hand, finish out the toes by pinching the tiny end loops flat. Pinch all four toes.
    Enlarge picture showing how to fine tune the feet

    38. Bravo! You now have one completed parrot foot. Don’t do a happy dance yet -- you still need to complete one more parrot foot. Take a breath, and go back to Steps 21 thru Step 35, repeating the entire process. Then meet me back here at STEP 37
    Enlarge picture showing one completed foot

    39. When you have completed your parrot feet, you may chose to clip the toes a bit shorter, depending on how may times you twist the wire or if one or two of your toes appear a bit longer. Just take a pair of scissors and "snip" back the toes until you are happy with the results. Be careful not to "snip" too much toe or you will have to make another foot.
    Enlarge picture showing how to clip the toes

    TIP

    If you are worried about the wire ends becoming "sharp" or unraveling after you have snipped them – no worries. You can use a very small amount of Zap-A-Gap formula applied to the toe end with the tip of a toothpick. Zap-A-Gap is like super glue – so when you use it, be careful you do not end up gluing your toothpick or fingers to your parrot foot.






    40. This photo shows two completed parrot feet, with leg ends clipped and slightly bent at an angle. You are almost ready to attach the parrot feet to your sculpt and bake. First though, you need to retrieve your parrot sculpt and make a few minor adjustments.
    Enlarge picture showing minor adjustments to the feet

    41. Alternative Parrot Feet
    O.K., so making those complicated parrot feet is just not your idea of having fun. The good news is you can "cheat" a bit here. These "cheat feet" will not have the detailed toes -- but will do in a pinch. This photo shows you how to make simple twisted wire "legs" which you can substitute for "detailed wire feet". Below are directions for making “cheat feet” (or twisted wire legs).

    1. Take a 2" wire length and bend it in half.
    2. Using your toothpick, wrap your wire.
    3. Holding the wire ends together with your fingers, begin to twist the toothpick.
    4. Clip the leg ends to a desired length.
    Enlarge picture showing an alternative method of making feet




    42. Before adding the wire feet, take your parrot sculpt in hand and very gently press into clay with your sculpting tool. This area is where you will insert the your wire feet.
    Enlarge picture showing where to indent to insert each foot

    43. Grip a completed parrot foot with your tweezers and carefully "insert" the leg end into your sculpt using an upward motion. Your parrot foot "leg ends" should not exceed ¼" in length as you may risk running the leg wire through your sculpt and out the other end. If the "leg end" wire looks too long, trim it back a bit, before you insert it. Do not trim the "leg ends" too short. If your "leg end" is too short, it will easily fall out of your sculpt after it has been baked.
    Enlarge picture showing how to insert a foot into the body

    44. Grip your second parrot foot with tweezers and repeat Step 43 by carefully inserting the leg end into your sculpt. Make sure your leg wires are evenly placed and spaced.
    Enlarge picture showing how to insert the second foot into the body

    45. After inserting your parrot feet into your sculpt, take your sculpting tool and smooth the clay around the leg. This will help secure the wire feet to your sculpt. This parrot sculpt is extremely small and the spacing between the feet is tight, so just take your time and enjoy the process.
    Enlarge picture showing how to smooth the clay around the leg

    46. Work on both of the legs evenly, smooth the clay using the end of your sculpting tool.
    Enlarge picture showing where to smooth the clay

    47. Finally, make sure that your parrot feet are even before you place your sculpt in the oven. Now is the time to make any last adjustments to the unbaked clay form.
    Enlarge picture showing spacing of feet

    TIP

    You are the artist! If you chose to, this is the time to give your miniature parrot some personality. To accomplish this, you can ever-so-gently hold your sculpt with one hand, and using the other hand, tilt your parrot head to the left or right before you bake.






    48. PREHEAT your oven per the manufacturers recommendations for your polymer clay. Place your sculpt on a tile or oven-safe dish and bake (10-15 minutes or per your polymer clay package instructions). Use an oven thermometer, if possible and keep an eye on the temperature. This is a tiny sculpt so take caution and do not over bake. Oh yes, don’t forget to wash your hands after handling the polymer clay.

    After your parrot sculpt has baked/cured in the oven and cooled, you are ready to add color with acrylic paints.
    Enlarge picture showing preparation before baking

    49. Optional Carving Details
    After baking/curing your sculpt in the oven and it has cooled, you may chose to carve a little more detail into your sculpture. You may want to shape the beak a bit more or define lines by carefully carving with an X-acto® knife or other carving tools.

    In the example photo, I decided to carve a little more detail into the cured sculpt with a Rio Rondo Carbide scraper tip. I wanted to define the beak point and wing lines. Personally, I find it is easier to grip your sculpture as you "carve" super-fine detail (like the pointed tip of the beak) into the oven-hardened clay sculpt -- rather than try and refine these details when the clay is "un-baked" and soft.
    Enlarge picture showing optional carving details




    TIP

    If after baking your parrot sculpt -- you notice that the wire feet are loose or "wobbly", you can secure them into place by using a small amount of Zap-A-Gap® on the tip of a toothpick. It only takes a very small amount of Zap-A-Gap® between the clay & wire (where the feet are inserted into the clay).






    50. Ready to add color. After you have finished baking, cooling and carving any additional detail into your sculpt -- gather up your paints and brushes. You are ready to add some brilliant color to your parrot.
    Enlarge picture preparing to add color

    51. You are ready to add some color and personality to your parrot sculpt? First, you may want to refer to your Conure Template and chose which Conure color pattern (Sun or Jendaya) you wish to paint.

    A Sun Conure has more yellow & orange that extends down the back and over the top of the wings. The Jendaya Conure has more green on it's wings and the yellow does not extend down the back. For these photos, I have chosen the Jendaya pattern and will paint with yellow and green acrylics using a fine paintbrush.
    Enlarge picture showing where to paint

    TIP

    If you already have your feathers and thread handy for Class 2, it's a good idea to match your acrylic paint color to the feather and thread colors.






    52. Now, you need to apply paint to the wire feet. I recommend using an enamel paint (gray in color -- or a mixture of black and white) on the wire. If you do not have any enamel paint, but chose to use acrylic paint on the feet, it may "flake off" of the wire when you bend or pose the parrot feet.
    Enlarge picture showing how to paint the parrot feet

    53. Before painting the eyes, it's a good idea to check the eye placement and color by referring back to your Conure Template. Both the Sun Conure & Jendaya Conure have a white-colored circle of skin around their eye. Paint this white circle first. Once the white has dried, paint the "eyeball" by taking a fine paintbrush and place a dot of black onto the white circle.

    If you have used black clay for your sculpt, you do not need to paint the beak. If you think the black clay looks "too dull", just apply a thin coat of matte sealer.
    Enlarge picture showing where to paint the eyes

    TIP

    If you want a "shiny" eye, simply place a drop of gloss sealer over the black dot. If you do not have any gloss sealer, you can chose to use black enamel paint for the eyes. I find that a "shiny" eye really brings a parrot sculpt to "life".







    This is the end of Tutorial 1
    You have finished your basic parrot sculpt; made the wire feet and attached them to your sculpt; baked/cured your parrot in the oven, and finally painted it with acrylics & enamel. Congratulations! You are ready to move on to the Feather & Flock phase in Class 2. This final phase is where your miniature Conure Parrot will really take shape and come alive!

    Reminder
    Before beginning Part 2 of this Tutorial, please review your materials list. The most important item is your feather choice. Your feathers should have a very fine, hair-like "rachis" or "spine". Dyed hen saddle feathers are the right size and work very well for this project. The initial materials list calls for 20 small feathers, however, in reality you will only use 10 or less after they have been cut-to-size. If you have never cut feathers to size before, it is best to have a few extra available to “practice” on.

    Try the Tutorial to dye your own feathers and thread to use for 1:12 or smaller scale feathering and flocking. Continue to Part 2, Learn To Flock and Feather a Parrot.

    Re: Hướng dẫn làm đồ chơi thu nhỏ (Miniature Tutorials)

    Learn To Flock and Feather
    1:12 Conure Parrot
    with IGMA Fellow
    Kerri Pajutee


    Materials Needed:
    • Feathers: 10-15 Green
    • Cotton, Silk or Poly Thread: DMC Cotton Embroider thread or Sewing Thread
    • Scissors
    • Ruler
    • Paintbrush: Fine 10/0
    • Tools
      - Toothpick
      - Darning Needle or Small Spoon-Tool
      - X-acto© Knife: #11 Blade
      - Tweezers
    • Glue: Hob-e-Tac Adhesive© or Tacky Glue
    • Water: Cup
    • Baby Wipes
    • Paper Towels
    • Several Small Containers for Holding Feathers and Flock






    OVERVIEW

    In this tutorial #2 you will learn to cut feathers to size and make your own flocking (from thread). You will learn how to apply feathers to the wings and tail, along with flocking to the rest of your 1:12 parrot sculpt (from Tutorial #1) using glue, a small paint brush and tweezers.

    Your feather and thread colors will depend on which Conure parrot you choose to make. Both the Sun Conure and the Jandaya Conure are similar in wing and tail colors (green and blue), however, if you choose a Sun Conure, you will need a bit more yellow and orange.

    If you cannot find commercially-dyed feathers for this project, you may chose to dye your own feathers and thread to use for 1:12 or smaller scale feathering and flocking.










    1. This photo shows a variety of feathers that would work for this project. On the left are dyed turkey flats and hen saddle feathers. The feathers on the right are from a sun conure parrot (I have a friend that owns one of these birds and she collects the feathers for me when her bird sheds/molts).
    Enlarge picture showing types of feathers

    TIP

    For this project, I chose a mixture of dyed hen saddle feathers and a few real conure feathers. The most important thing to remember when choosing your feathers for creating miniature feathered birds is the size of your feather rachis or spine. You want to chose feathers with a hair-fine spine. If the spine is too thick, it will not look natural, and will be too thick and stiff when applying to your parrot.






    2. Grip the feather in one hand and begin trimming the right side from the tip upward. Work slowly, and carefully cut in a straight line following the spine. Sharp scissors and steady hand work best. Don't get discouraged if your feather looks a bit "ragged" at first. Cutting a smooth, straight line across the vanes takes practice. The more feathers you cut, the more confident you will become.
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim the right side of the feather

    3. After you have trimmed the right side - turn your feather over in your hand, and begin trimming the left side. Trim from the tip upward. Make sure you trim the feather with both sides an even distance from the center spine. You want to trim your feathers down to approximately 1/16" in width if possible.
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim the left side of the feather


    4. You may need to trim the tips of your feathers after you cut them to size. To do this, carefully round the tip using your scissors.
    Enlarge picture showing how round the feather tips


    5. After you finish trimming, your cut feather should look like.
    Enlarge picture showing progress of cut feather

    6. You will need to save some of your feather trimmings. These trimmings come in handy as fill-ins when you glue your feathers onto your parrot sculpt.
    Enlarge picture showing saved feather pieces

    7. To use your trimmings you can carefully take your tweezers and gently pull apart the vanes to the width you choose. These trimmings work nicely when a full feather is just too much.
    Enlarge picture showing how to separate the vanes of the feather

    8. Continue to trim all your feathers and set aside. You will need approximately 10-15 cut feathers. As you can see from the photo, much of the original feather vanes have been cut away. After you have cut all your feathers to "size" you may want to go back to trim and reshape some of the "ragged" edges on a few.
    Enlarge picture showing where to trim

    TIP

    With this project, you will find that you may end up not using all your cut-to-size feathers for your parrot sculpt -- but its nice to be able to pick the "best" ones from the bunch you have trimmed up.

    For now, leave your feather lengths as is and set them aside. You will clip actual lengths you need to use, when you begin to attach the feathers to your parrot sculpt with glue.






    9. Set your cut feathers aside to a safe (draft-free area), you are ready to make your own flocking. Before you can cut your thread into flocking, you will need to unwind a fair amount of length from the spool (if you are using sewing thread), wrap this around your fingers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to start making flock

    10. When you have finished wrapping the thread around your fingers, cut the thread from the spool and set the spool aside.
    Enlarge picture showing how to wrap the thread

    11. Slip your index finger out from under the wound loop and cut ends in half with scissors.
    Enlarge picture showing how where to cut the thread

    12. Pinch the thread ends together and begin to cut the thread as fine as you can into a container. The finer the "cut - the better the flock. Your flock should resemble "fluffy powder".
    Enlarge picture showing how to cut the thread

    13. Making your own flock is a tedious process. Remember...don't rush it. Try to cut a fine, consistent length with every clip. To fluff it up a bit in the container, gently stir with a toothpick.
    Enlarge picture showing the flock

    TIP

    How much flock and how many different colors you cut will depend on which conure pattern you chose. If you are making a Jendaya conure you will only need a small amount of green and yellow. If you want to make a sun conure, you may want to cut some additional orange or red-orange.






    14. Cut enough flock to generously cover the areas of color on your parrot sculpt. Store your cut flocking in a small container with a lid and set aside. This photo actually shows much more than what you will need (but it makes for a nice, colorful photo). You are now finished with cutting your thread into flocking. Set aside.
    Enlarge picture showing flock colors you will need

    15. You will now begin applying feathers to your parrot sculpt. To begin the feathering process, you need a ruler and scissors to trim-to-length the tail feathers. Start by cutting 4 feathers at approximately inch in length.
    Enlarge picture showing feather preparation

    A WORD OR TWO ABOUT THE GLUE

    For this project, I am using Hob-e-Tac by Woodland Scenics. It is water-soluble, goes on white and sets up to a clear tacky in a couple of minutes. The feathers adhere to it very nicely and I do not have to wait for each stage or layer of feathers to dry completely before moving on to the next stage or layer of feathers (which I would have to do if I were using a craft glue like Aleenes Tacky glue).

    The one drawback with using Hob-e-Tac is that you need to close up the bottle lid with each application otherwise the entire bottle will begin to set up and, you need to wash your paintbrush (with water) after each glue application (if you fail to wash your paintbrush, the glue it will set up on it yuk!).

    O.K., enough preaching on gluelets get started.






    16. Use any glue you do use sparingly! If you use too much glue it will seep or bleed through your feathers and show when dry.
    Enlarge picture showing type of glue

    17. Take your parrot sculpt in hand and apply the glue onto the tail section.
    Enlarge picture showing where to glue to the tail area

    18. The placement of the red dots in this diagram shows where the first 3 tail feathers will be placed onto your parrot sculpt.
    Enlarge picture showing diagram for first tail feather placements

    19. With a pair of tweezers, apply the first tail feather. Gently press the feather into the glue to set. Remember not to use too much glue here or it will bleed through your feather.
    Enlarge picture showing first feather

    20. Apply the second tail feather with your tweezers and gently press into the glue to set.
    Enlarge picture showing first feather

    TIP

    If you are using a water-based craft glue like Aleenes Tacky glue or other, you will need to pause and wait between feather layer applications. For example, you can glue the top portion of the tail then wait a bit to let that dry before turning your parrot over and starting on the underside. This will give the glued feathers a chance to set up and dry.

    If you rush ahead, you may end up shifting your feathers or pressing too hard into the wet glue with your fingers (trying to hold on to your tiny parrot). Sometimes the glue will bleed through and discolor the feather turning it darker or lighter when dry. The best way to avoid this is 1) not to apply the glue to thick; 2) dont press the feather too hard into the glue; and 3) let it dry between handling and adding another layer of feathers.






    21. Before applying feather #3, you may need to add a tiny bit of glue to set the feather to the top-middle portion of your parrot tail.
    Enlarge picture showing where to glue before continuing

    22. Apply the third feather with your tweezers and press to set into the glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply the third feather

    TIP

    Use just a bit of pressure to "place" the feather. Once it is where you want it, gently "press" it into place with tweezers. You can also lightly touch it with your finger too - to "tap/press" it into place.






    23. Now, turn your parrot over in your hand and lets begin to apply some feathers to the underside of the tail section. Apply some glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue to the back of the tail

    TIP

    I use Aleene's Tacky glue on other animal flocking/furring projects - but not for birds (feathers). The Hob-e-Tac will set up clear and will grab the feathers just right (with a little practice). You still need to be careful not to "squish" or "mash" down on your newly placed feathers.






    24. Remember when I mentioned earlier in the tutorial, that you need to keep some of your feather trimmings. Here is an opportunity to apply some. With your tweezers, you will place a small strip of feather trimmings to both left and right sides of the underside of your parrot tail.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply feather trimmings

    25. Applying additional fillers. These feather trimmings are perfect feather fillers because they do not have a spine.
    Enlarge picture showing additional feather trimmings



    Q: It also appears that you are bending the spine of the feathers like this ) instead of a straight line from top to bottom

    A: No bending. It may be that you are seeing how the "hen saddle" type of feather slightly curves a bit. It's best to have a straighter feather spine.






    26. Take your fourth and final tail feather and apply it in the middle of the underside of the tail section. This feather should slightly overlap your feather trimmings. Gently push the feather into the glue to set.

    Bravo! You are finished with feathering the tail section of your parrot. Set your parrot sculpt aside, as you will now start to trim the wing feathers for application.
    Enlarge picture showing the final tail feather application

    BEFORE THE NEXT STEP

    You will trim two (2) sets of wing feathers. First, the primaries (the longer wing tip feathers), and second, the primary-coverts (the smaller, second row of overlapping feathers).

    Cut 8 primary wing feathers approximately 3/8 to less than inch in length (depending on the actual size of your parrot sculpt). If you are not sure, trim a feather and hold it up to where you would glue it to your parrot wing and gauge the length from there.

    Next, cut 8-10 primary-covert wing feathers approximately inch or less in length. Again, use your judgment, depending on the size of your actual parrot sculpt. You will use these tiny feathers as a second row, by applying them to just barely overlap your first row of longer primary feathers. If you are creating a sun conure color pattern, you will want to cut some yellow primary coverts (shown in the photo).






    27. In this photo, I have cut feathers of different colors (green, light green & yellow). Again, if you chose to make a sun conure parrot, you will need some yellow primary-covert feathers. If you are making a jendaya conure you can cut all green feathers.
    Enlarge picture showing different colors of feathers

    28. The following diagram shows approximately where you will glue your 4 primary wing feathers.
    Enlarge picture showing the wing diagram

    29. Begin by applying a small amount of glue along the wing as shown in photo.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue to the wing

    30. With your tweezers take one of the long primary feathers and place it onto the wing glue (at an angle). Press gently to set. It might be easier to hold you parrot by the head during this process being careful not to get your fingers into the glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place the primary feather

    31. Once the first wing feather is in place, pick up the second primary feather with your tweezers and set it into the glue next to the first feather. Your feather should slightly overlap the previous feather.
    Enlarge picture showing the placement of the second feather

    32. Repeat this process with the next two feathers so you have a total of four primary feathers on each wing.
    Enlarge picture showing the repeat process

    33. Once you have all four primary feathers in place on one side you will want to repeat the steps on the other. Holding your parrot by its head (so as not to press into your glued wing feathers) -- apply the glue. With your tweezers take one of the long primary feathers and place it into the glue (at an angle crossing over the first set of wing feathers. See photo example. Press gently to set.
    Enlarge picture showing placement of feathers

    34. Continue to apply the remaining three primary feathers into place (slightly overlapping them).
    Enlarge picture continuing to apply the remaining three primary feathers

    35. When you are finished, you should have four primaries feathers on each wing.
    Enlarge picture showing four primaries feathers

    36. Once you have all your primary feathers in place, its time to add the smaller primary-covert feathers. These feathers will be glued to the wings above the primary feathers. This second row of feathers will consist of at least 4 on each side. If you are creating a sun conure this row should be yellow. If you are making a jendaya color pattern this row will be green. Apply glue.
    Enlarge picture showing placement of smaller primary-covert feathers

    37. With tweezers place a primary-covert feather onto the glue, just slightly overlapping your primary row. Continue to apply these feathers, one by one, until you have placed all four. You can use your tweezer ends or finger to gently press into the glue to set. See photo example.
    Enlarge picture showing placement of smaller primary-covert feathers

    TIP

    Depending on the size of your parrot, you may decide that you want to add one or two more primary-covert feathers. If you notice that you have areas on the wing that look as if they need another feather or two just trim a few more and add them where needed. You are the artist!






    38. Once you have finished applying the primary-covert feathers on the first wing You will need to repeat the same process on the other wing. First apply the glue. Then with your tweezers place a small primary-covert onto the glue, slightly overlapping the first row of primary feathers. With tweezers, place the second, third & final fourth feather into place. Here I have selected a Jendaya conure color pattern - so I have placed both primary & primary-covert feathers in green.
    Enlarge picture showing the repeat process of Step 36

    TIP

    You may feel that your parrots wing does not need to be trimmed with an X-acto knife at this stage thats O.K. I do this to remove any bulk feathers and uneven edges before I glue the next layer of feathers and flock. Use your own judgment its your parrot sculpt!






    39. If you have finished applying both primary & primary-covert feathers to your parrots wings, you are ready to "clean up or trim" your feather spines and lines before moving on to the next step. To do this, take an X-acto knife and very gently press/score (trim) the upper tips (edges) of your primary-covert feathers. Be very careful here that you do not press too hard and cut through your sculpt or your hand. If you are using a new, sharp blade, it will not take much pressure.
    Enlarge picture showing how to clean up the feather spines

    40. After the feathers have been scored/cut remove excess feathers and glue with tweezers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use your tweezers

    TIP

    Now, to add a final thin layer of feather trimmings onto the back of your parrot wings. This is not a necessary step, but I like to finish out my wing feathers by taking a small piece of trim and overlapping my last layer of primary-coverts (on each upper wing). This feather technique looks especially nice if you are making a larger parrot like a Macaw.






    41. Apply a bit of glue in a "V" shape as shown.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply glue on the back

    42. Take a small end section of a feather trimming and place over the glued area. It should overlap just a bit onto the primary-covert layer.
    Enlarge picture showing where to place the feather trimming

    43. Do this on both wings. Because I am making a Jendaya color pattern this trimming is shown in green. However, if you are making a sun conure pattern you would want this feather trimming to be yellow.
    Enlarge picture showing the repeated process on the other side

    44. If you should have any overlap of trimming (and you will probably have a small amount) - you can simply score and trim away using your X-acto knife.
    Enlarge picture showing how to trim away overlap

    45. Finally, you will finish up the feather process by turning your parrot over and working on the underside of each wing. Depending on how deep you made your crease detail (under each wing) on your original parrot sculpt, will determine how much feather trimming you will use here. If you do not have any wing crease detail, then skip this step.

    Apply a very small amount of glue using a fine brush. With your tweezers, take a thin amount of feather trimmings and place onto glue. You may want to take a toothpick and gently press the feather trimming into the crease. Repeat on other wing. Trim away any excess "top" length with X-acto knife or scissors.
    Enlarge picture showing how to feather the under wing




    TIP

    One of the hardest parts about feathering and flocking such a small parrot is handling it gently while you work. It's easy to mess up the feathers or grip too tightly and squish both feathers and glue. If you have to wait a bit until the glue has a chance to dry - the better. If you end up totally screwing up one or two of your feathers in the process - replace them before moving on to flocking.






    46. You will need to retrieve your flocking and prepare it for gluing onto your parrot. Take your flocking and pinch a bunch with your tweezers.
    Enlarge picture on retrieving the flock

    47. Place this flock onto a clean, dust/lint-free work area. You want your parrot flock to be free of various bits of stuff (like hair, pieces of trimmed feathers, etc.)
    Enlarge picture showing prepared work area

    48. Take your finger and tap the flocking as flat as you can. This makes it easier to pick up with the tweezers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to tap the flock flat

    TIP

    Start with your parrots tail base, legs & chest area first. I have chosen the Jendaya color pattern, so my parrot has a little green on its lower parts then transitions to yellow on the chest. If you have chosen a sun conure this area can be done in all yellow flock.






    49. Apply a small amount of Hob-e-Tac glue. It helps to hold your parrot sculpt by the head during this process - so as not to damage your newly feathered areas by gripping too hard. With your tweezers pick up some flocking (a even, thin layer) and apply it to the glue. Cover the area as evenly as you can with flock. You may need to apply a couple of tweezer-loads, but keep them as thin a layer as possible. If you place a bulk of flock onto the glue, you are more apt to have a lumpy parrot.

    Gently and evenly press the flocking into the glue to set using the end of your tweezers, toothpick, a sculpting spoon type tool, or fingers. Blow or very lightly "brush" away any excess flock using a paintbrush or micro-tip applicator before applying more glue.
    Enlarge picture showing where to apply the green flock




    50. I have applied the green flocking to the bottom area and will transition to yellow flocking from the chest upward to the neck and head area. Work one small section at a time this will keep your fingers out of the glue.
    Enlarge picture showing how to transition to yellow flocking

    TIP

    I like to use a micro-tip applicator for removing any excess flocking that remains stubborn and will not blow away. The excess flock tends to "stick" to the applicator brush. When removing excess flock - work very delicately, you do not want to remove to much or the glue will start to show. If you remove or brush away too much flock - just add a bit more glue and flock to the area and press.






    51. Slowly work up the neck and head area of your parrot with glue, then flocking. Blow away any excess before you begin to add glue to a new section. Press the flock into the glue evenly and smoothly. I usually finish the underside first, then turn my parrot over and work on the back of wings and neck and head area.
    Enlarge picture showing how you work the flock up the neck and head

    52. Turn your parrot over. During this stage of flocking, I find it helps to hold the parrots feet. Apply a small amount of glue on the back of the wings. Most of your wings are already covered in feather, except for the upper portion. I have chosen a Jendaya color pattern so this section is green flocking. If you are making a sun conure color pattern, this would be yellow flocking.

    After you have evenly covered the glue with flock, press into the glue using your finger or tool of your choice. You want it to be smooth and even -- then blow, or brush away the excess before moving onto the final neck and head area.
    Enlarge picture showing the final placement of flock on the underside




    53. Continue to hold your parrots feet, resting it onto your fingers. Apply glue to the neck and head area. Be careful not to apply any glue around the white eye area and beak. With your tweezers place some flock evenly and press using your fingers or tool of choice. Work slowly around the delicate eye and beak. If you do happen to get glue or flock onto these areas, just dip a paintbrush in a little water and wipe away. You can also use the tip of your tweezers and lift or push away the excess (but I prefer a moist, fine-tipped paintbrush (or microtip applicator) as it tends to grab the flocking and glue better). When you have finished pressing your flock into the glue evenly and smoothly -- blow or brush away the excess.
    Enlarge picture showing how flock is applied to the head area

    SOME FINAL DETAILS ABOUT COLOR

    After flocking using either yellow or a combination of yellow and green (jendaya), you may chose to add a splash of dark orange or orange-red coloring to your parrot. Both the Jendaya & Sun conure have some of these colors (See Tutorial #1 color template for both Sun and Jendaya Conure examples).






    54. There are several ways you can add this additional color. First, you can trim a tiny amount of orange or orange-red thread into flocking and apply with glue. I prefer this method when working on a larger parrot like a macaw.
    Enlarge picture showing how to add color

    55. You can also apply this color using a micro-tip fiber applicator and a soft chalk pastel. Rub a small amount of chalk pastel onto your micro tip and apply it to the flocking. For my Jendaya conure, I used a dark orange as well as a cobalt blue on the mid-wing section.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use a micro-tip applicator

    56. If you chose to use pastels on your flocking, you will need to spray a fixative onto the surface to keep it from smearing or coming off when handled. After applying chalk pastel colors to the flocking, I will spray a very light coat of alcohol-free, hairspray onto my parrot to set the color. WARNING Do not use too much hairspray, or it will darken or spot your feathers.
    Enlarge picture showing how to use chalks

    57. Here is my little Jendaya Conure, who measures 1 inch in length from beak to tail.
    Enlarge picture showing completed Jendaya Conure

    58. You have completed your Conure! I hope you had as much fun with this project as I did.
    Enlarge picture showing different angle of completed Jendaya Conure


    This is the end of Tutorial 2
    You have finished your basic parrot sculpt; made the wire feet and attached them to your sculpt; baked/cured your parrot in the oven, and finally painted it with acrylics & enamel. Congratulations! You are ready to move on to the Feather & Flock phase in Class 2. This final phase is where your miniature Conure Parrot will really take shape and come alive!
    Woman of short-lived passions

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